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Computational Mechanics ’95

Theory and Applications

  • S. N. Atluri
  • G. Yagawa
  • Thomas Cruse

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxxii
  2. ICES’95 General Lectures

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
  3. Object-Oriented Approaches in Computational Mechanics

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 14-14
    2. M. Hatakeyama, K. Akita, Y. Hasegawa, N. Takimoto, M. Watanabe
      Pages 27-32
    3. Shigeyuki Maeda, Yuji Tokunaga, Hiroshi Takeda
      Pages 33-38
    4. U. Meißner, U. Rüppel, F. Peters
      Pages 45-50
    5. Michael D. Rucki, Gregory R. Miller
      Pages 51-56
    6. M. Hatakeyama, I. Kaneko, H. Uehara, M. Naoi, N. Takimoto
      Pages 57-62
    7. Y. Mimura, Y. Akahoshi, S. Harada, Y. Kanto, T. Aosa
      Pages 63-68
  4. Neural Network / Fuzzy / AI

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 69-69
    2. T. Ochiai, T. Shuto, S. Hamabe, A. Yamaguchi, N. Maeda, G. Yagawa
      Pages 88-92
  5. Adaptive Methods

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 93-93

About these proceedings

Introduction

AI!, in the earlier conferences (Tokyo, 1986; Atlanta, 1988, Melbourne, 1991; and Hong Kong, 1992) the response to the call for presentations at ICES-95 in Hawaii has been overwhelming. A very careful screening of the extended abstracts resulted in about 500 paper being accepted for presentation. Out of these, written versions of about 480 papers reached the conference secretariat in Atlanta in time for inclusion in these proceedings. The topics covered at ICES-95 range over the broadest spectrum of computational engineering science. The editors thank the international scientific committee, for their advice and encouragement in making ICES-95 a successful scientific event. Special thanks are expressed to the International Association for Boundary Elements Methods for hosting IABEM-95 in conjunction with ICES-95. The editors here express their deepest gratitude to Ms. Stacy Morgan for her careful handling of a myriad of details of ICES-95, often times under severe time constraints. The editors hope that the readers of this proceedings will find a kaleidoscopic view of computational engineering in the year 1995, as practiced in various parts of the world. Satya N. Atluri Atlanta, Georgia, USA Genki Yagawa Tokyo,Japan Thomas A. Cruse Nashville, TN, USA Organizing Committee Professor Genki Yagawa, University of Tokyo, Japan, Chair Professor Satya Atluri, Georgia Institute of Technology, U.S.A.

Keywords

algorithms bifurcation computational mechanics computational method damage damage mechanics dynamics finite element method fluid mechanics fracture instability inverse problem mechanics stability structural mechanics

Editors and affiliations

  • S. N. Atluri
    • 1
  • G. Yagawa
    • 2
  • Thomas Cruse
    • 3
  1. 1.Computational Modeling CenterGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Quantum Engineering & Systems ScienceThe University of TokyoBunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113Japan
  3. 3.Department of Mechanical EngineeringVanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-79654-8
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-79656-2
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-79654-8
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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