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Microvascular Reconstruction

Anatomy, Applications and Surgical Technique

  • Ralph T. Manktelow

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XIII
  2. Preamble

    1. Ralph T. Manktelow
      Pages 1-3
  3. Tissue Transfers

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 5-5
    2. Ralph T. Manktelow
      Pages 7-7
    3. Ralph T. Manktelow
      Pages 8-13
    4. Ralph T. Manktelow
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    5. Ralph T. Manktelow
      Pages 25-30
    6. Ralph T. Manktelow
      Pages 31-34
    7. Ralph T. Manktelow
      Pages 35-36
    8. Ralph T. Manktelow
      Pages 37-44
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      Pages 45-52
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      Pages 61-61
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      Pages 62-67
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      Pages 68-76
    14. Ralph T. Manktelow
      Pages 77-83
  4. Microvascular Reconstructions

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 85-85
    2. Ralph T. Manktelow
      Pages 87-87
    3. Ralph T. Manktelow
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    14. Ralph T. Manktelow
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    15. Ralph T. Manktelow
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    16. Ronald M. Zuker
      Pages 208-217
  5. Back Matter
    Pages 219-221

About this book

Introduction

Reconstructive microvascular surgery is now in its teens. At first many thought this new child was a whim and would fail to thrive. Some were un­ certain, others with vision either supported or became actively involved in this new area of surgical endeavour. Although initial interest was focused on the replantation of amputated parts, it has been the one stage free trans­ fer of living tissue to a distant site which has launched microsurgery into the surgical spotlight. From its humble beginnings we have witnessed a revolution in this branch of plastic surgery; many of the long established methods of recon­ struction have, like barricades, fallen before the advances made in this field. In its infancy there were relatively few procedures available. There was a tendency to make the patient's problem fit the operation, rather than the reverse, and this frequently led to an inferior result. The then known flaps, such as the groin flap and the deltopectoral flap, were employed. Unfortunately they were sites which posed many technical problems; namely those of vascular anomaly, a short pedicle and vessels of small cal­ ibre. Long operations were the norm, and vascular thrombosis was not un­ common. Hospital routine often was disrupted and there was a danger that these new techniques would fall into disrepute. Over the last decade this state of affairs has changed dramatically.

Keywords

Gefässchirurgie child evolution hospital microsurgery plastic surgery reconstruction surgery thrombosis tissue transplantation vascular surgery

Authors and affiliations

  • Ralph T. Manktelow
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of MedicineUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Division of Plastic SurgeryToronto General HospitalTorontoCanada

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-70329-4
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-70331-7
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-70329-4
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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