Growth and Defence in Plants

Resource Allocation at Multiple Scales

  • Rainer Matyssek
  • Hans Schnyder
  • Wolfgang Oßwald
  • Dieter Ernst
  • Jean Charles Munch
  • Hans Pretzsch

Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 220)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxv
  2. Introduction

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. R. Matyssek, J. Koricheva, H. Schnyder, D. Ernst, J. C. Munch, W. Oßwald et al.
      Pages 3-24
  3. Mechanisms of Resource Allocation in Plants and Stands

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 25-28
    2. D. Ernst, M. Jürgensen, G. Bahnweg, W. Heller, G. Müller-Starck
      Pages 29-51
    3. N. Kolosova, J. Bohlmann
      Pages 85-109
    4. R. Hampp, A. Hartmann, U. Nehls
      Pages 111-139
    5. C. A. Lehmeier, F. A. Lattanzi, H. Schnyder
      Pages 141-155
    6. H. Schnyder, U. Ostler, C. Lehmeier, M. Wild, A. Morvan-Bertrand, R. Schäufele et al.
      Pages 157-173
    7. M. Leuchner, C. Hertel, T. Rötzer, T. Seifert, R. Weigt, H. Werner et al.
      Pages 175-191
    8. R. Agerer, A. Hartmann, K. Pritsch, S. Raidl, M. Schloter, R. Verma et al.
      Pages 213-242
    9. K.-H. Häberle, R. Weigt, P. S. Nikolova, I. M. Reiter, J. Cermak, G. Wieser et al.
      Pages 243-271
    10. T. E. E. Grams, M. J. Daigo, J. B. Winkler, S. Gayler, R. Matyssek
      Pages 273-286
  4. Unifying Theory in Resource Allocation?

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 331-333
    2. E. Priesack, S. Gayler, T. Rötzer, T. Seifert, H. Pretzsch
      Pages 335-353
    3. W. zu Castell, R. Matyssek, A. Göttlein, F. Fleischmann, A. Staninska
      Pages 355-373

About this book

Introduction

Plants use resources, i.e. carbon, nutrients, water and energy, either for growth or to defend themselves from biotic and abiotic stresses. This volume provides a timely understanding of resource allocation and its regulation in plants, linking the molecular with biochemical and physiological-level processes. Ecological scenarios covered include competitors, pathogens, herbivores, mycorrhizae, soil microorganisms, carbon dioxide/ozone regimes, nitrogen and light availabilities. The validity of the “Growth-Differentiation Balance Hypothesis” is examined and novel theoretical concepts and approaches to modelling plant resource allocation are discussed. The results presented can be applied in plant breeding and engineering, as well as in resource-efficient stand management in agriculture and forestry.

 

Keywords

allocation biotic interaction defence growth plants trade-off

Editors and affiliations

  • Rainer Matyssek
    • 1
  • Hans Schnyder
    • 2
  • Wolfgang Oßwald
    • 3
  • Dieter Ernst
    • 4
  • Jean Charles Munch
    • 5
  • Hans Pretzsch
    • 6
  1. 1.Chair of Ecophysiology of PlantsTechnical University of Munich Chair of Ecophysiology of PlantsFreisingGermany
  2. 2.Chair of Grassland ScienceTechnische Universität MünchenFreisingGermany
  3. 3.Chair of Phytopathology of Woody PlantsTechnische Universität MünchenFreisingGermany
  4. 4.Institute of Biochemcial Plant BiologyHelmholtz-Zentrum MünchenNeuherbergGermany
  5. 5.Institute of Soil EcologyHelmholtz-Zentrum MünchenNeuherbergGermany
  6. 6.LS WaldwachstumskundeTU München LS WaldwachstumskundeFreisingGermany

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-30645-7
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-30644-0
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-30645-7
  • Series Print ISSN 0070-8356
  • Series Online ISSN 2196-971X
  • About this book
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