Procedural Justice and Legitimacy in Policing

  • Lorraine Mazerolle
  • Elise Sargeant
  • Adrian Cherney
  • Sarah Bennett
  • Kristina Murphy
  • Emma Antrobus
  • Peter Martin

Part of the SpringerBriefs in Criminology book series (BRIEFSCRIMINOL)

Also part of the SpringerBriefs in Translational Criminology book sub series (BRIEFSTRANSLAT)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xi
  2. Lorraine Mazerolle, Elise Sargeant, Adrian Cherney, Sarah Bennett, Kristina Murphy, Emma Antrobus et al.
    Pages 1-11
  3. Lorraine Mazerolle, Elise Sargeant, Adrian Cherney, Sarah Bennett, Kristina Murphy, Emma Antrobus et al.
    Pages 13-26
  4. Lorraine Mazerolle, Elise Sargeant, Adrian Cherney, Sarah Bennett, Kristina Murphy, Emma Antrobus et al.
    Pages 27-32
  5. Lorraine Mazerolle, Elise Sargeant, Adrian Cherney, Sarah Bennett, Kristina Murphy, Emma Antrobus et al.
    Pages 33-42
  6. Lorraine Mazerolle, Elise Sargeant, Adrian Cherney, Sarah Bennett, Kristina Murphy, Emma Antrobus et al.
    Pages 43-53
  7. Lorraine Mazerolle, Elise Sargeant, Adrian Cherney, Sarah Bennett, Kristina Murphy, Emma Antrobus et al.
    Pages 55-63
  8. Lorraine Mazerolle, Elise Sargeant, Adrian Cherney, Sarah Bennett, Kristina Murphy, Emma Antrobus et al.
    Pages 65-70
  9. Back Matter
    Pages 71-81

About this book

Introduction

This brief focuses on the “doing” of procedural justice: what the police can do to implement the principles of procedural justice, and how their actions can improve citizen perceptions of police legitimacy. Drawing on research from Australia (Mazerolle et al), the UK (Stanko, Bradford, Jackson etc al), the US (Tyler, Reisig, Weisburd), Israel (Jonathon-Zamir et al), Trinidad & Tobago (Kochel et al) and Ghana (Tankebe), the authors examine the practical ways that the police can approach engagement with citizens across a range of different types of interventions to embrace the principles of procedural justice, including:

·         problem-oriented policing

·         patrol

·         restorative justice

·         reassurance policing

·         and community policing.

Through these examples, the authors also examine some of the barriers for implementing procedurally just ways of interacting with citizens, and offer practical suggestions for reform. This work will be of interest for researchers in criminology and criminal justice focused on policing as well as policymakers.

Keywords

Administration of Justice Community Policing Enhancing Police Legitimacy Problem-oriented Policing Procedural Justice Restorative Justice

Authors and affiliations

  • Lorraine Mazerolle
    • 1
  • Elise Sargeant
    • 2
  • Adrian Cherney
    • 3
  • Sarah Bennett
    • 4
  • Kristina Murphy
    • 5
  • Emma Antrobus
    • 6
  • Peter Martin
    • 7
  1. 1.Institute for Social Science ResearchUniversity of QueenslandSt. LuciaAustralia
  2. 2.Institute for Social Science ResearchUniversity of QueenslandSt LuciaAustralia
  3. 3.School of Social ScienceUniversity of QueenslandSt LuciaAustralia
  4. 4.Institute for Social Science ResearchUniversity of QueenslandSt LuciaAustralia
  5. 5.School of Criminology and Criminal Justi Bldg M10Griffith UniversityMt GravattAustralia
  6. 6.Institute for Social Science ResearchUniversity of QueenslandSt LuciaAustralia
  7. 7.Operations Support CommandQueensland Police ServiceBrisbaneAustralia

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-04543-6
  • Copyright Information Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014
  • Publisher Name Springer, Cham
  • eBook Packages Humanities, Social Sciences and Law
  • Print ISBN 978-3-319-04542-9
  • Online ISBN 978-3-319-04543-6
  • Series Print ISSN 2192-8533
  • Series Online ISSN 2192-8541
  • About this book