The Sudoku Effect: Universities in the Vicious Circle of Bureaucracy

  • Stefan Kühl

Part of the SpringerBriefs in Education book series (BRIEFSEDUCAT)

About this book

Introduction

This book shows that the introduction of the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) of credit points as a new accounting unit at universities has led to increased bureaucracy and the schoolmaster-style regimentation of Bachelor’s and Master’s courses. It explains how, due to the pressure of having to plan every single working hour of studying in advance, a ‘Sudoku Effect’ is created by the necessity to combine courses, exams and modules in such a way that the points ‘add up’. An unintentional side effect of the introduction of the ECTS, the Sudoku Effect has led to more classroom style teaching, an inflation of exams and fewer choices available to students. It has resulted in such complex and contradictory guidelines for the planning of the curriculum that the values attributed to the higher education reform can often only be realised if the rules for Bachelor’s and Master’s programmes are ignored, or at least stretched, in practice. The book describes how the reaction to this situation is the continuous further refinement of the complicated rules rather than their abolishment.

Keywords

Bachelor's and Master's courses ECTS credit system bureaucracy in universities classroom style teaching reform of Bachelor degree programmes the Bologna Reform

Authors and affiliations

  • Stefan Kühl
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyBielefeld UniversityBielefeldGermany

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-04087-5
  • Copyright Information The Author(s) 2014
  • Publisher Name Springer, Cham
  • eBook Packages Humanities, Social Sciences and Law
  • Print ISBN 978-3-319-04086-8
  • Online ISBN 978-3-319-04087-5
  • Series Print ISSN 2211-1921
  • Series Online ISSN 2211-193X
  • About this book