Biopsy Pathology of Muscle

  • Michael Swash
  • Martin S. Schwartz

Part of the Biopsy Pathology Series book series (BPS)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-x
  2. Michael Swash, Martin S. Schwartz
    Pages 1-13
  3. Michael Swash, Martin S. Schwartz
    Pages 14-33
  4. Michael Swash, Martin S. Schwartz
    Pages 34-46
  5. Michael Swash, Martin S. Schwartz
    Pages 47-75
  6. Michael Swash, Martin S. Schwartz
    Pages 76-94
  7. Michael Swash, Martin S. Schwartz
    Pages 95-116
  8. Michael Swash, Martin S. Schwartz
    Pages 117-131
  9. Michael Swash, Martin S. Schwartz
    Pages 132-157
  10. Michael Swash, Martin S. Schwartz
    Pages 158-179
  11. Michael Swash, Martin S. Schwartz
    Pages 180-191
  12. Michael Swash, Martin S. Schwartz
    Pages 192-198
  13. Back Matter
    Pages 199-206

About this book

Introduction

During the last 20 years the development of enzyme histochemical techniques has contributed greatly to knowledge of muscle pathology. However, these and other new methods, such as electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry, have only relatively recently become gener­ ally available for routine use in histopathology. Muscle biopsy is a long-established technique in clinical practice, having been introduced by Duchenne in 1868 (Arch. Gen. Med. , 11, 5-179). However, the needle method used by Duchenne was not generally adopted, although Shank and Hoagland described a similar technique in 1943 (Science, 98, 592). During this time muscle biopsies required a surgical procedure and this was a considerable disincentive to their use. It was not until Bergstrom (1962; Scand. J. Clin. Lab. Invest. , 14, Suppl. 68) and Edwards (1971; Lancet, ii, 593--6) developed a simple biopsy needle suitable for muscle work in connection with exercise physiology that the advantages of needle muscle biopsies came to be appreciated. Since then, muscle biopsies have become a relatively minor procedure. This has led to the increasing use of muscle biopsy in clinical practice, both for diagnosis and for assessing progress in repeated biopsies during the course of a disorder and its treatment. The full range of enzyme histochemical and ultrastructural histological techniques can be applied to these small biopsies and many of the older histological staining methods can also be used. This book is intended to serve as a practical guide in muscle pathology, particularly for histopathologists, and for those in training.

Keywords

biopsy electron microscopy histopathology pathology

Authors and affiliations

  • Michael Swash
    • 1
    • 2
  • Martin S. Schwartz
    • 3
  1. 1.The London Hospital and St Mark’s HospitalLondonUK
  2. 2.The London Hospital Medical CollegeLondonUK
  3. 3.St George’s Hospital (Atkinson Morley’s Hospital)LondonUK

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-3402-4
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-0-412-24420-9
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4899-3402-4
  • About this book
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Biotechnology
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Pharma