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Stress and Coping in Nursing

  • Authors
  • Roy Bailey
  • Margaret Clarke

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Understanding the Approach

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Roy Bailey, Margaret Clarke
      Pages 3-34
    3. Roy Bailey, Margaret Clarke
      Pages 35-69
  3. Nurses — Stress and Coping

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 71-71
    2. Roy Bailey, Margaret Clarke
      Pages 73-94
    3. Roy Bailey, Margaret Clarke
      Pages 95-106
    4. Roy Bailey, Margaret Clarke
      Pages 107-122
    5. Roy Bailey, Margaret Clarke
      Pages 123-162
  4. Patients — Stress and Coping

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 163-163
    2. Roy Bailey, Margaret Clarke
      Pages 165-187
    3. Roy Bailey, Margaret Clarke
      Pages 188-211
    4. Roy Bailey, Margaret Clarke
      Pages 212-232
    5. Roy Bailey, Margaret Clarke
      Pages 233-255
    6. Roy Bailey, Margaret Clarke
      Pages 256-289
    7. Roy Bailey, Margaret Clarke
      Pages 290-315
  5. Conclusions

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 317-317
    2. Roy Bailey, Margaret Clarke
      Pages 319-321
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 322-335

About this book

Introduction

Increasingly, stress as a concept is being used as an explanation of a wide variety of negative phenomena which are experienced by all people, but which include nurses in particular and their patients. Nursing has been identified as a 'high stress' profession and one can hardly pick up a nursing journal, or even read a newspaper article about nursing, without finding the word stress used liberally. Examples of its use are found in relation to sickness/absence rates, high level of nursing staff turnover, discontent in nursing, the effects of unemployment, the effects of overwork, having too much responsibility, having too Iittle responsibility or control, the effects of constantly giving emotionally to others, the causes of iIIness, the effects of going into hospital, delayed healing, anxiety, depression and alcoholism. Given the heterogeneous nature of these phenomena, some of which are the diametric opposite of others and that they are c1early being attributed to the one concept, stress, then that concept must necessarily be of importance within people's lives. Or is it perhaps just a fashionable, global, but uItimately empty explanation? Roy Bailey and I believe that stress is an extremely important concept. Indeed, we would argue that it is a meta-concept rat her than a concept, which does indeed serve to explain many disparate phenomena.

Keywords

anxiety depression nursing

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-2941-9
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-0-412-33830-4
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4899-2941-9
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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