Nursing Informatics

Where Caring and Technology Meet

  • Marion J. Ball
  • Kathryn J. Hannah
  • Ulla Gerdin Jelger
  • Hans Peterson

Part of the Computers in Health Care book series (HI)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxv
  2. Nursing Informatics

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-2
    2. Mastering Change

      1. Denis Protti
        Pages 3-10
      2. Marion J. Ball, Judith V. Douglas
        Pages 11-17
      3. Noel Daly
        Pages 18-24
      4. Elizabeth E. Ball, Gary L. Hammon
        Pages 25-29
    3. A Neural View of Computing for Nurses

      1. Robert I. O’Desky
        Pages 33-45
      2. Ulla Gerdin Jelger, Hans Peterson
        Pages 46-51
      3. James M. Gabler
        Pages 52-63
      4. Hans Peterson, Ulla Gerdin Jelger
        Pages 64-77
    4. New Roles for Nurses

      1. Marion J. Ball, Kathryn J. Hannah
        Pages 81-87
      2. Thomas Jenkins
        Pages 88-95
      3. Beth Jaekle
        Pages 103-105
      4. Marcia Orsolits, Carolyne K. Davis, Mark S. Gross
        Pages 106-111
  3. Where Caring and Technology Meet

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 113-114
    2. Clinical Practice

      1. Ann Warnock-Matheron, Cheryl Plummer
        Pages 115-127
      2. Russell E. Tranbarger
        Pages 128-137
      3. Shirley Hughes
        Pages 138-145
      4. Constance M. Berg, Darlene Larson
        Pages 146-159

About this book

Introduction

Nursing, like other health-related professions, is information-inten­ sive. The quality of care a patient receives is based on the soundness of judgment exercised by the health care team. Underlying sound judg­ ment is up-to-date information. Unless nurses have access to accurate and pertinent information, the care being rendered will not be of the highest standard. What is required is not necessarily more rapid and efficient informa­ tion services. Modern technology can process immense amounts of data in the blink of an eye. What we in the health professions need are information systems that are more intelligent, systems that can inte­ grate information from many sources, systems that analyze and syn­ thesize information and display it so that it may be applied directly in patient care-in other words, information that answers a question or even gives practical advice. In order to accomplish such objectives, work is needed to establish the scientific and theoretical basis for the use of computing and infor­ mation systems by health professionals. This is the research com­ ponent. In addition, there is the need for continued development and evaluation of practical information systems.

Keywords

care computer computer science education health health care nursing research treatment

Editors and affiliations

  • Marion J. Ball
    • 1
  • Kathryn J. Hannah
    • 2
  • Ulla Gerdin Jelger
    • 3
  • Hans Peterson
    • 3
  1. 1.University of MarylandBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Faculty of NursingUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada
  3. 3.Health Care Information SystemsStockholm County CouncilStockholmSweden

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4757-4160-5
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988
  • Publisher Name Springer, New York, NY
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4757-4162-9
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4757-4160-5
  • Series Print ISSN 1431-1917
  • About this book
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