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The Bacterial Cell Surface

  • Stephen M. Hammond
  • Peter A. Lambert
  • Andrew N. Rycroft

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-vii
  2. Stephen M. Hammond, Peter A. Lambert, Andrew N. Rycroft
    Pages 1-28
  3. Stephen M. Hammond, Peter A. Lambert, Andrew N. Rycroft
    Pages 29-56
  4. Stephen M. Hammond, Peter A. Lambert, Andrew N. Rycroft
    Pages 57-118
  5. Stephen M. Hammond, Peter A. Lambert, Andrew N. Rycroft
    Pages 119-146
  6. Stephen M. Hammond, Peter A. Lambert, Andrew N. Rycroft
    Pages 147-193
  7. Stephen M. Hammond, Peter A. Lambert, Andrew N. Rycroft
    Pages 194-219
  8. Back Matter
    Pages 220-226

About this book

Introduction

It is a common statement that because of its simplicity the bacterial cell makes an ideal model for the study of a wide variety of biological systems and phenomena. While no-one would dispute that much of our under­ standing of biological function derives from the study of the humble bacterium, the concept of a simple life-form would be hotly disputed by any scientist engaged in the determination of the relationship between structure and function within the bacterial cell. Bacteria are particularly amenable to intensive study; their physiology can be probed with powerful biochemical, genetical and immunological techniques. Each piece of information obtained inevitably raises as many questions as answers, and can lead to a highly confused picture being presented to the lay reader. Nowhere is this more evident than in the study of the surface layers of the bacterial cell. Examination of the early electron micrographs suggested that the bacterial cytoplasm was surrounded by some sort of semi-rigid layer, possessing sufficient intrinsic strength to protect the organism from osmotic lysis. The belief that the surface layers were rather passive led to their neglect, while researchers concentrated on the superficially more exciting cytoplasmic components. Over the last twenty years our view of the bacterial envelope has undergone extensive revision, revealing a structure of enormous complexity.

Keywords

bacteria bacterial cell biological cell complexity cytoplasm electron environment information iron lead physiology structure

Authors and affiliations

  • Stephen M. Hammond
    • 1
  • Peter A. Lambert
    • 2
  • Andrew N. Rycroft
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of LeedsUK
  2. 2.Department of PharmacyUniversity of Aston in BirminghamUK
  3. 3.University of Glasgow Veterinary SchoolUK

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-6553-2
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 1984
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-0-7099-1267-5
  • Online ISBN 978-94-011-6553-2
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
Industry Sectors
Pharma
Biotechnology