Boron in Soils and Plants

Proceedings of the International Symposium on Boron in Soils and Plants held at Chiang Mai, Thailand, 7–11 September, 1997

  • R. W. Bell
  • B. Rerkasem

Part of the Developments in Plant and Soil Sciences book series (DPSS, volume 76)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiv
  2. Boron Responses in Field Crops

  3. Residual Effects of Boron Fertilizer Application

  4. Methods and Procedures of Boron Determination in Plants and Soils

    1. H. Iikura, T. Kataoka, M. Tamada, T. M. Nakanishi, C. Yonezawa
      Pages 63-67
    2. T. M. Nakanishi, H. Iikura, T. Kataoka, M. Tamada, J. Furukawa, C. Yonezawa
      Pages 69-72
  5. Diagnosis and Prognosis of Boron Deficientcy

    1. Marcia J. Lambert, John Turner, Jim Knott
      Pages 83-88
    2. R. N. Noppakoonwong, B. Rerkasem, R. W. Bell, B. Dell, J. F. Loneragan
      Pages 89-93
    3. S. P. Srivastava, C. R. Yadav, T. J. Rego, C. Johansen, N. P. Saxena
      Pages 95-99
  6. Boron X Genotypes Interactions

    1. P. Anantawiroon, K. D. Subedi, B. Rerkasem
      Pages 101-104

About this book

Introduction

The economic significance of boron (B) in agriculture, horticulture, and forestry has been beyond dispute for several decades. Even in the last two decades, the areas where B deficiency limits plant production has grown with increased reports from China, south Asia and southeast Asia. The present volume is reflective of the growing awareness of the significance of low soil B with reports from Australia, Bangladesh, Brazil, north, central and southern China, India, Nepal, and the North West Frontier Province of Pakistan contained herein. Boron deficiency also continues to be a problem for crop yield and quality in areas where B deficiency has been known for some time, for example in Germany and the USA. The problem of low soil B is not limited to effects on field crop yield, with papers reporting on depressed wood yield and quality in timber trees (Lambert et al. ), and depressed fruit quality (Dong et al. ; Smith et al. : Zude et al. ) also appearing in the present volume. Globally, Shorrocks (1997)1 estimates that ?? tonnes of B fertiliser is applied annually in agriculture. The economic benefits from the use of B fertiliser have not been quantified but are clearly enormous. Paradoxically, the clear economic imperatives for using B fertiliser on low B soils are not matched by a similar clarity of understanding of the role and functions of B in plants.

Keywords

cell environment physiology soil toxicity

Editors and affiliations

  • R. W. Bell
    • 1
  • B. Rerkasem
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Environmental Science, Division of SciencesMurdoch UniversityAustralia
  2. 2.Multiple Cropping CentreChiang Mai UniversityChiang MaiThailand

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-5564-9
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-94-010-6344-9
  • Online ISBN 978-94-011-5564-9
  • About this book