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Finalization in Science

The Social Orientation of Scientific Progress

  • Authors
  • Gernot Böhme
  • Wolfgang Van Den Daele
  • Rainer Hohlfeld
  • Wolfgang Krohn
  • Wolf Schäfer
  • Wolf Schäfer

Part of the Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science book series (BSPS, volume 77)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xviii
  2. Authors’ Introduction

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Gernot Böhme, Wolfgang Van Den Daele, Rainer Hohlfeld, Wolfgang Krohn, Wolf Schäfer
      Pages 3-11
  3. Case Studies

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 13-13
    2. Gernot Böhme, Wolfgang Van Den Daele, Rainer Hohlfeld, Wolfgang Krohn, Wolf Schäfer
      Pages 15-16
  4. Theoretical Considerations

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 127-127
    2. Gernot Böhme, Wolfgang Van Den Daele, Rainer Hohlfeld, Wolfgang Krohn, Wolf Schäfer
      Pages 129-130
    3. Gernot Böhme, Wolfgang Van Den Daele, Rainer Hohlfeld
      Pages 131-172
    4. Gernot Böhme, Wolfgang Van Den Daele, Wolfgang Krohn
      Pages 173-205
    5. Wolf Schäfer
      Pages 207-231
  5. Prospects

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 233-233
    2. Gernot Böhme, Wolfgang Van Den Daele, Rainer Hohlfeld, Wolfgang Krohn, Wolf Schäfer
      Pages 235-236
    3. Wolfgang Van Den Daele, Wolfgang Krohn
      Pages 237-250
    4. Gernot Böhme, Wolf Schäfer
      Pages 251-269
  6. Appendix

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 271-271
    2. Gernot Böhme, Wolfgang Van Den Daele, Rainer Hohlfeld, Wolfgang Krohn, Wolf Schäfer
      Pages 273-274
  7. Back Matter
    Pages 273-299

About this book

Introduction

These essays on Finalization in Science - The Social Orientation of Scientific Progress comprise a remarkable, problematic and controversial book. The authors propose a thesis about the social direction of scientific research which was the occasion of a lively and often bitter debate in Germany from 1976 to 1982. Their provocative thesis, briefly, is this: that modern science converges, historically, to the development of a number of 'closed theories', i. e. stable and relatively completed sciences, no longer to be improved by small changes but only by major changes in an entire theoretical structure. Further: that at such a stage of 'mature theory', the formerly viable norm of intra-scientific autonomy may appropriately be replaced by the social direction' of further scientific research (within such a 'mature' field) for socially relevant or, we may bluntly say, 'task-oriented' purposes. This is nothing less than a theory for the planning and social directing of science, under certain specific conditions. Understandably, it raised the sharp objections that such an approach would subordinate scientific inquiry as a free and untrammeled search for truth to the dictates of social relevance and dominant interests, even possibly to dictation and control for particularistic social and political interests.

Keywords

Renaissance biology philosophy of science science

Editors and affiliations

  • Wolf Schäfer
    • 1
  1. 1.Johann Wolfgang Goethe-UniversitätFrankfurt/MainGermany

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-7080-9
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 1983
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-94-009-7082-3
  • Online ISBN 978-94-009-7080-9
  • Series Print ISSN 0068-0346
  • Buy this book on publisher's site