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Cooperative Research and Development: The Industry—University—Government Relationship

  • Albert N. Link
  • Gregory Tassey

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxi
  2. The Role Players

  3. National Strategies

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 63-63
    2. David B. Audretsch
      Pages 103-125
    3. L. Fernando Ruiz-Mier
      Pages 127-141
  4. Impacts on Industrial Strategies

  5. Back Matter
    Pages 209-217

About this book

Introduction

We must all hang together or surely we will all hang separately. Benjamin Franklin The significant apathy that characterized relationships between indus­ try and universities and the adversarial nature of relationships between industry and government have both faded rapidly in the 1980s as the realities of global competition have surfaced in the United States. Both industry and government leaders articulate a number of constructs for regaining our competitiveness in world markets. One of the more fre­ quent strategies prescribed in this new competitiveness era is cooperation. Different individuals or groups may espouse different definitions, inter­ pretations, or areas of emphasis, but the overall importance of this concept is substantial. Although examples of cooperative research have existed for several decades, the number and variety of relationships have expanded rapidly in the 1980s as corporations, universities, and governments have embraced this strategy. Joint ventures involving two or three firms increased from under 200 per year in the 1970s to over 400 per year by the mid-1980s. Multiple-firm cooperative arrangements are a more recent phenomenon, made possible by the National Cooperative Research Act of 1984. By mid- 1988,81 of these industry-level consortia had formed under the provisions of the 1984 Act. The rapid growth in cooperative research and development (R&D) is primarily a response to the pressures of international competition. As a corporate strategy, cooperative R&D meets short-term needs for assets to implement new approaches for coping with intensifying competition.

Keywords

competitiveness development research & development (R&D) strategy technology policy

Editors and affiliations

  • Albert N. Link
    • 1
  • Gregory Tassey
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsUniversity of North Carolina at GreensboroUSA
  2. 2.National Institute of Standards and TechnologyUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-2522-9
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 1989
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-94-010-7639-5
  • Online ISBN 978-94-009-2522-9
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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