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© 1989

Facility Location and the Theory of Production

Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Arthur P. Hurter Jr., Joseph S. Martinich
    Pages 1-11
  3. Arthur P. Hurter Jr., Joseph S. Martinich
    Pages 13-44
  4. Arthur P. Hurter Jr., Joseph S. Martinich
    Pages 45-73
  5. Arthur P. Hurter Jr., Joseph S. Martinich
    Pages 75-106
  6. Arthur P. Hurter Jr., Joseph S. Martinich
    Pages 107-151
  7. Arthur P. Hurter Jr., Joseph S. Martinich
    Pages 153-183
  8. Arthur P. Hurter Jr., Joseph S. Martinich
    Pages 185-210
  9. Arthur P. Hurter Jr., Joseph S. Martinich
    Pages 211-227
  10. Arthur P. Hurter Jr., Joseph S. Martinich
    Pages 229-233
  11. Back Matter
    Pages 235-251

About this book

Introduction

The design and location of production facilities are important aspects of corporate strategy which can have a significant impact on the socio­ economy of nations and regions. Here, these decisions are recognized as being interrelated; that is, the optimal plant design (input mix and output level) depends on the location of the plant, and the optimal location of the plant depends on the design of the plant. Until the late 1950s, however, the questions of where a firm should locate its plant and what should be its planned input mix and output level were treated, for the most part, as separate questions, and were investigated by different groups of research­ ers. Although there was some recognition that these questions are inter­ I 1928; Hoover 1948; Isard 1956], no detailed analysis related [e. g. , Pre doh or formal structure was developed combining these two problems until the work of Moses [1958]. In recent years scholarly interest in the integrated production/locaton decision has been increasing rapidly. At the same time that research on the integrated production/location problem was expanding, significant related work was occurring in the fields of operations research, transportation science, industrial engineering, eco­ nomics, and geography. Unfortunately, the regional scientists working on the production/location problem had little contact with researchers in other fields. They generally publish in different journals and attend dif­ ferent professional meetings. Consequently, little of the recent work in these fields has made its way into the production/location research and vice versa.

Keywords

Transport facility location operations research production

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Industrial Engineering and Management SciencesNorthwestern UniversityUSA
  2. 2.School of Business AdministrationUniversity of Missouri—St. LouisUSA

Bibliographic information

Industry Sectors
Pharma
Automotive
Biotechnology
Consumer Packaged Goods
Engineering
Finance, Business & Banking
Electronics
Energy, Utilities & Environment
Aerospace

Reviews

` ... the authors deserve credit for writing an innovative and interesting book. Facility Location and the Theory of Production would be an excellent reference for specialists in production theory. The book could also be used as a graduate course text.' Transportation Science, 24:4, 1990