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American Manufacturing in a Global Market

  • Kenneth W. Chilton
  • Melinda E. Warren
  • Murray L. Weidenbaum

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xvii
  2. Effects of public policy on manufacturing’s future

  3. Multinational firms and global markets

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 55-55
    2. John McDonnell
      Pages 63-67
    3. Yoshito Tokumitsu
      Pages 69-72
  4. Education’s restructuring task

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 97-97
    2. Jeanne Allen
      Pages 107-112
  5. Organizing for success

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 127-127
    2. Jerry Moskowitz
      Pages 135-143
    3. J. Robert Copper
      Pages 145-149
    4. Ralph Lobdell
      Pages 151-155
  6. The changing work environment

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 157-157
    2. Dennis Stachelski
      Pages 165-170
    3. Diane Mulligan
      Pages 171-177
    4. Rudolph Oswald
      Pages 179-181
  7. R & D and quality

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 183-183
    2. Earle Harbison Jr.
      Pages 185-191
    3. Marshall Phelps Jr.
      Pages 193-198
    4. Myra Williams
      Pages 199-206
  8. Back Matter
    Pages 207-214

About this book

Introduction

The health of American manufacturing has been a cause of real concern during the 1980s. Foreign competition, hostile takeovers, new technologies and a host of other factors have caused dramatic changes in this key sector of the American economy. Many ob­ servers of this process of change are singing the "rust belt blues," consigning U.S. manufacturing greatness to the history books. In April 1986, the Center for the Study of American Business at Washington University issued a study by its director, Dr. Murray L. Weidenbaum, which challenged this perception of American manu­ facturing's future. The report, entitled Learning to Compete, pointed to a variety of positive developments resulting from the ad­ versity faced by American firms in the first half of the decade: pro­ ducers had improved quality and productivity, reduced costs, and in­ creased emphasis on R&D. In November 1988, as a logical extension of this research, the Center held a conference on American Manufacturing in the 1990s. Focusing on American responses to the changing global competitive environment, this conference brought together the practical experi­ ence of business professionals and the more detached views of aca­ demic and media experts. In a day and a half of meetings, encompassing six separate ses­ sions, a luncheon address and an after-dinner debate, conference participants assembled an extensive profile on the state of U.S.

Keywords

Hostile Takeover competition economy environment innovation management manufacturing meeting merger mergers productivity public policy research & development (R&D) rhetoric trust

Editors and affiliations

  • Kenneth W. Chilton
  • Melinda E. Warren
  • Murray L. Weidenbaum
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for the Study of American BusinessWashington UniversitySt. LouisUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-2516-8
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 1989
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-94-010-7636-4
  • Online ISBN 978-94-009-2516-8
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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