Advertisement

Entities and Indices

  • M. J. Cresswell

Part of the Studies in Linguistics and Philosophy book series (SLAP, volume 41)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xi
  2. Multiple Indexing

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. M. J. Cresswell
      Pages 1-16
    3. M. J. Cresswell
      Pages 17-33
    4. M. J. Cresswell
      Pages 34-46
    5. M. J. Cresswell
      Pages 47-62
    6. M. J. Cresswell
      Pages 63-75
    7. M. J. Cresswell
      Pages 76-92
  3. Ontological Commitment

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 93-93
    2. M. J. Cresswell
      Pages 95-110
    3. M. J. Cresswell
      Pages 111-129
    4. M. J. Cresswell
      Pages 130-141
    5. M. J. Cresswell
      Pages 142-155
    6. M. J. Cresswell
      Pages 156-172
    7. M. J. Cresswell
      Pages 173-193
  4. Indexical Quantification

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 195-195
    2. M. J. Cresswell
      Pages 197-212
    3. M. J. Cresswell
      Pages 213-227
    4. M. J. Cresswell
      Pages 228-241
    5. M. J. Cresswell
      Pages 242-259
  5. Back Matter
    Pages 260-274

About this book

Introduction

In ordinary discourse we appear to ta1k about many things that have seemed mysterious to philosophers. We say that there has been a hitch in our arrangements or that the solution to the problem required us to examine all the probable outcomes of our action. So it would seem that we speak as if in addition to eloeks, mountains, queens and grains of sand there are hitches, arrangements, solutions, probiems, and probable outcomes. It is not immediately obvious when we must take such ta1k as really assuming that there are such to develop tests for things, and one of the tasks in this book is discerning what has eome to be called ontological commitment, in naturallanguage. Among the entities that natural language appears to make reference to are those connected with temporal and modal discourse, times, possibilities, and so on. Such entities play a crueial role in the kind of semantieal theories that I and others have defended over many years. These theories are based on the idea that an essential part of the meaning of a sentence is constituted by the conditions under whieh that sentenee is true. To know what a sentence says is to know what the world would have to be !ike for that sentence to be true.

Keywords

language media opera quantifiers time

Authors and affiliations

  • M. J. Cresswell
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Victoria University of WellingtonNew Zealand
  2. 2.University of Massachusettes at AmherstUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-2139-9
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 1990
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-0-7923-0967-3
  • Online ISBN 978-94-009-2139-9
  • Series Print ISSN 0924-4662
  • Buy this book on publisher's site