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© 2002

The Logic of Thermostatistical Physics

Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XV
  2. Gérard G. Emch, Chuang Liu
    Pages 1-38
  3. Gérard G. Emch, Chuang Liu
    Pages 39-79
  4. Gérard G. Emch, Chuang Liu
    Pages 81-112
  5. Gérard G. Emch, Chuang Liu
    Pages 113-152
  6. Gérard G. Emch, Chuang Liu
    Pages 153-197
  7. Gérard G. Emch, Chuang Liu
    Pages 199-235
  8. Gérard G. Emch, Chuang Liu
    Pages 237-259
  9. Gérard G. Emch, Chuang Liu
    Pages 261-294
  10. Gérard G. Emch, Chuang Liu
    Pages 295-330
  11. Gérard G. Emch, Chuang Liu
    Pages 331-372
  12. Gérard G. Emch, Chuang Liu
    Pages 373-392
  13. Gérard G. Emch, Chuang Liu
    Pages 393-429
  14. Gérard G. Emch, Chuang Liu
    Pages 431-450
  15. Gérard G. Emch, Chuang Liu
    Pages 451-476
  16. Gérard G. Emch, Chuang Liu
    Pages 477-518
  17. Gérard G. Emch, Chuang Liu
    Pages 519-537
  18. Back Matter
    Pages 539-703

About this book

Introduction

This book deals with models and model-building in classical and quantum physics; it relies on logic and the philosophy of science as well as on modern mathematics. The reader will also find vistas into the history of ideas. The philosophical analysis is based on the separation of syntax and semantics which is at the root of Kolmogorov's theory of probability; recursive functions and algorithmic complexity are used to discuss entropy and randomness. Basic concepts are discussed together with concrete physical models for phase transitions, scaling, renormalization semigroups, and the irreversible approach to equilibrium. The book is intended for mathematicians, physicists and philosophers of science, both researchers and graduate students.

Keywords

Complexity Models Semantics Statistical Mechanics entropy phase Transition philosophy of science physical theory probability quantum mechanics science statistical physics

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.Department of MathematicsUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of PhilosophyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

Bibliographic information

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Reviews

From the reviews of the first edition:

"Gibbs introduced one century ago an axiomatic approach to statistical mechanics. The a posteriori remarkable success of the Gibbsian formalism is, however, even today in sharp contrast to our lack of understanding of its mechanical foundation. The book The Logic of Thermostatiscal Physics puts into perspective this contrast for classical mechanical systems and for their quantum mechanical counterparts. [...] The book deals with many aspects of not only the logical but also the physical foundation of thermostatistics. Tracing the history of its development makes it a pleasure to read." (Mathematical Reviews 2003g)

"[This] clearly written book contains interesting historical remarks and shows the philosophy behind thermo-statistics. The extraordinarily detailed list of references and its far-reaching range makes the book valuable for mathematicians, physicists and philosophers of science in research and teaching. Its representation may stimulate further philosophical investigations." (Zentralblatt MATH 2004, vol. 1033, page 571)

"This book is a tremendously erudite and comprehensive resource in foundations of statistical mechanics. It is also a significant contribution to the philosophical discussion of models and theories. Philosophers will value the applications of the semantic view of the theories to a wide range of cases in physics. … For those doing research in foundations of statistical physics, having this wealth of information in one place will prove invaluable." (Craig Callender, Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics, Vol. 35, 2004)

"In this book a mathematical physicist and a philosopher report on their professional struggle with the foundational problems of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. … It is an excellent historical and technical introduction to the BCS theory of superconductivity, and to more recent work on mean field models of dilute gas BEC." (C. Savage, The Physicist, Vol. 39 (3), 2002)