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Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology

Ergebnisse der Mikrobiologie und Immunitätsforschung

  • W. Arber
  • W. Braun
  • R. Haas
  • W. Henle
  • P. H. Hofschneider
  • N. K. Jerne
  • P. Koldovský
  • H. Koprowski
  • O. Maaløe
  • R. Rott
  • H. G. Schweiger
  • M. Sela
  • L. Syruček
  • P. K. Vogt
  • E. Wecker
Conference proceedings

Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 57)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-229
  2. Volker ter Meulen, Michael Katz, Dieter Müller
    Pages 1-38
  3. Julian D. Gross
    Pages 39-74
  4. B. Říhová-Škárová, I. Říha
    Pages 159-187
  5. Back Matter
    Pages 189-229

About these proceedings

Introduction

Phenomena as diverse as tuberculin sensitivity, delayed sensitivity to soluble proteins other than tuberculin, contact allergy, homograft rejection, experimental autoallergies, and the response to many microorganisms, have been classified as members of the class of immune reactions known as delayed or cellular hypersensitivity. Similarities in time course, histology, and absence of detectable circulating immunoglobulins characterize these cell-mediated immune reactions in vivo. The state of delayed or cellular hypersensitivity can be transferred from one animal to another by means of sensitized living lymphoid cells (CHASE, 1945; LANDSTEINER and CHASE, 1942; MITCHISON, 1954). The responsible cell has been described by GOWANS (1965) as a small lymphocyte. Passive transfer has also been achieved in the human with extracts of sensitized cells (LAWRENCE, 1959). The in vivo characteristic of delayed hypersensitivity from which the class derives its name is the delayed skin reaction. When an antigen is injected intradermally into a previously immunized animal, the typical delayed reaction begins to appear after 4 hours, reaches a peak at 24 hours, and fades after 48 hours. It is grossly characterized by induration, erythyma, and occasionally necrosis. The histology of the delayed reaction has been studied by numerous investigators (COHEN et al. , 1967; GELL and HINDE, 1951; KOSUNEN, 1966; KOSUNEN et al. , 1963; MCCLUSKEY et al. , 1963; WAKSMAN, 1960; WAKSMAN, 1962). Initially dilatation of the capillaries with exudation of fluid and cells occurs.

Keywords

Allergie Antigen Immunität biology cell histology immunoglobulin immunology microbiology microorganism necrosis protein proteins

Editors and affiliations

  • W. Arber
    • 1
  • W. Braun
    • 2
  • R. Haas
    • 3
  • W. Henle
    • 4
  • P. H. Hofschneider
    • 5
  • N. K. Jerne
    • 1
  • P. Koldovský
    • 4
  • H. Koprowski
    • 4
  • O. Maaløe
    • 6
  • R. Rott
    • 7
  • H. G. Schweiger
    • 8
  • M. Sela
    • 9
  • L. Syruček
    • 10
  • P. K. Vogt
    • 11
  • E. Wecker
    • 12
  1. 1.BasleSwitzerland
  2. 2.Canada
  3. 3.FreiburgGermany
  4. 4.PhiladelphiaUSA
  5. 5.MunichGermany
  6. 6.CopenhagenDenmark
  7. 7.GießenGermany
  8. 8.WilhelmshavenGermany
  9. 9.RehovotIsrael
  10. 10.PragueCzech Republic
  11. 11.SeattleUSA
  12. 12.WürzburgGermany

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-65297-4
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1972
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-65299-8
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-65297-4
  • Series Print ISSN 0070-217X
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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