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Olfaction

  • J. E. Amoore
  • M. G. J. Beets
  • J. T. Davies
  • T. Engen
  • J. Garcia
  • R. C. Gesteland
  • P. P. C. Graziadei
  • K.-E. Kaissling
  • R. A. Koelling
  • J. LeMagnen
  • P. MacLeod
  • D. G. Moulton
  • M. M. Mozell
  • D. Ottoson
  • T. S. Parsons
  • S. F. Takagi
  • D. Tucker
  • B. M. Wenzel
  • Editors
  • Lloyd M. Beidler

Part of the Handbook of Sensory Physiology book series (SENSORY, volume 4 / 1)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-viii
  2. P. P. C. Graziadei
    Pages 27-58
  3. D. G. Moulton
    Pages 59-74
  4. David Ottoson
    Pages 95-131
  5. Robert C. Gesteland
    Pages 132-150
  6. Maxwell M. Mozell
    Pages 205-215
  7. Trygg Engen
    Pages 216-244
  8. John E. Amoore
    Pages 245-256
  9. M. G. J. Beets
    Pages 257-321
  10. J. T. Davies
    Pages 322-350
  11. Karl-Ernst Kaissling
    Pages 351-431
  12. Bernice M. Wenzel
    Pages 432-448
  13. John Garcia, Robert A. Koelling
    Pages 449-464
  14. J. LeMagnen
    Pages 465-482
  15. Back Matter
    Pages 483-549

About this book

Introduction

Olfaction is involved intimately in two of the most basic functions of animals: food intake and reproduction. There are also many other involvements of olfaction in animal behavior, not the least being communication. The authors of this volume have collected and evaluated the comparative anatomy, electron microscopy, electrophysiology, genetics, psychology, chemistry, and biophysics of the olfactory system and then indicated their roles in animal behavior. The importance of olfaction in the everyday life of an animal is just being realized fully and recent years have brought forth a great surge of research in this area. The diverse dis­ ciplines that contribute to our understanding of olfaction make the development of this volume rewarding for those working in this field. The olfactory system's very high sensitivity and its great power of molecular discrimination interests many chemists and physicists. Data from the study of both vertebrates and insects show that only one molecule of certain odors is necessary to stimulate a single olfactory receptor! The underlying physicochemical events are not yet understood. Also, many mammals can discriminate quickly the difference between two odors of similar structure. Thus the olfactory epithelium and the more centrally located neural components present the ultimate in chemical detection and analysis by a biological system. The principles involved are probably common to those of many other organs.

Keywords

Geruchsorgan anatomy chemistry development genetics insects physics physiology psychology reproduction system vertebrates

Authors and affiliations

  • J. E. Amoore
    • 1
  • M. G. J. Beets
    • 2
  • J. T. Davies
    • 3
  • T. Engen
    • 4
  • J. Garcia
    • 5
  • R. C. Gesteland
    • 6
  • P. P. C. Graziadei
    • 7
  • K.-E. Kaissling
    • 8
  • R. A. Koelling
    • 9
  • J. LeMagnen
    • 10
  • P. MacLeod
    • 10
  • D. G. Moulton
    • 11
  • M. M. Mozell
    • 12
  • D. Ottoson
    • 13
  • T. S. Parsons
    • 14
  • S. F. Takagi
    • 15
  • D. Tucker
    • 16
  • B. M. Wenzel
    • 17
  1. 1.Composition Investigations, Vegetable LaboratoryUnited States Department of AgricultureAlbanyUSA
  2. 2.International Flavors & Fragrances (Europe)HilversumNetherlands
  3. 3.Department of Chemical EngineeringThe University of BirminghamEdgbastonGreat Britain
  4. 4.Walter S. Hunter Laboratory of PsychologyBrown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  5. 5.Department of PsychologyState University of New York at Stony BrookStony BrookUSA
  6. 6.Department of Biological SciencesNorthwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA
  7. 7.Department of Biological ScienceThe Florida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA
  8. 8.Abteilung SchneiderMax-Planck-Institut für VerhaltensphysiologieSeewiesenGermany
  9. 9.University of California at Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA
  10. 10.Collège de FranceFrance
  11. 11.Monell Chemical Senses CenterUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  12. 12.Department of Physiology, College of MedicineState University of New YorkSyracuseUSA
  13. 13.VeterinärhögskolanFysiologiska InstitutionenStockholm 50Sweden
  14. 14.Department of Zoology, Ramsay Wright Zoological LaboratoriesUniversity of TorontoToronto 5Canada
  15. 15.Department of Physiology, School of MedicineGunma UniversityMaebashi, GunmaJapan
  16. 16.Department of Biological ScienceThe Florida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA
  17. 17.Department of Physiology and Brain Research Institute, UCLA School of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-65126-7
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1971
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-65128-1
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-65126-7
  • Series Print ISSN 0072-9906
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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