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© 2012

Chemical Evolution of Galaxies

  • Educates graduate students and young researchers to start their own research in the field

  • Outlines theoretical models of chemical evolution of galaxies and compares them with observational results

  • Treats all main aspects of chemical evolution of galaxies in a didactical and logical order

  • Author with great expertise and strong reputation

Book

Part of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Library book series (AAL)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Francesca Matteucci
    Pages 1-18
  3. Francesca Matteucci
    Pages 19-52
  4. Francesca Matteucci
    Pages 53-66
  5. Francesca Matteucci
    Pages 67-85
  6. Francesca Matteucci
    Pages 131-169
  7. Francesca Matteucci
    Pages 171-194
  8. Francesca Matteucci
    Pages 195-208
  9. Back Matter
    Pages 209-225

About this book

Introduction

The term “chemical evolution of galaxies” refers to the evolution of abundances of chemical species in galaxies, which is due to nuclear processes occurring in stars and to gas flows into and out of galaxies.

This book deals with the chemical evolution of galaxies of all morphological types (ellipticals, spirals and irregulars) and stresses the importance of the star formation histories in determining the properties of stellar populations in different galaxies. The topic is approached in a didactical and logical manner via galaxy evolution models which are compared with observational results obtained in the last two decades: The reader is given an introduction to the concept of chemical abundances and learns about the main stellar populations in our Galaxy as well as about the classification of galaxy types and their main observables. In the core of the book, the construction and solution of chemical evolution models are discussed in detail, followed by descriptions and interpretations of observations of the chemical evolution of the Milky Way, spheroidal galaxies, irregular galaxies and of cosmic chemical evolution.

The aim of this book is to provide an introduction to students as well as to amend our present ideas in research; the book also summarizes the efforts made by authors in the past several years in order to further future research in the field.

Keywords

Chemical Evolution of Galaxies Classification of Galaxies Galaxies Nucleosynthesis in Stars Star formation history Stellar population The Milky Way

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.Dipto. AstronomiaUniversità di TriesteTriesteItaly

About the authors

Francesca Matteucci is associate professor at the University of Trieste, Italy, where she teaches Stellar Physics. Her field of research is the chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type, supernova rates and supernova progenitors.

Bibliographic information

  • Book Title Chemical Evolution of Galaxies
  • Authors Francesca Matteucci
  • Series Title Astronomy and Astrophysics Library
  • Series Abbreviated Title Astronomy,Astrophysics Library
  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-22491-1
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Physics and Astronomy Physics and Astronomy (R0)
  • Hardcover ISBN 978-3-642-22490-4
  • Softcover ISBN 978-3-642-43005-3
  • eBook ISBN 978-3-642-22491-1
  • Series ISSN 0941-7834
  • Edition Number 1
  • Number of Pages XIV, 226
  • Number of Illustrations 0 b/w illustrations, 0 illustrations in colour
  • Topics Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
  • Buy this book on publisher's site

Reviews

From the reviews:

“In order to evolve a galaxy, you must choose a mass of gas; decide on a prescription for turning it into stars … . Matteucci’s book explains … how to do all these things, ending with a discussion of cosmic chemical evolution … . anyone wanting to get up to speed quickly on the topic should find the book very useful. It is mercifully short and has lots of nice figures comparing models and data for abundance gradients, correlations of various elements, and so forth.” (Virginia Trimble, The Observatory, Vol. 132 (1229), August, 2012)