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© 2008

Applied Charged Particle Optics

Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-X
  2. Pages 67-88
  3. Pages 89-103
  4. Pages 105-107
  5. Back Matter
    Pages 109-131

About this book

Introduction

Authored by a pioneer of the field, this overview of charged particle optics provides a solid introduction to the field for all physicists wishing to design their own apparatus or better understand the instruments with which they work. Applied Charged Particle Optics begins by introducing electrostatic lenses and fields used for acceleration, focussing and deflection of ions or electrons. Subsequent chapters give detailed descriptions of electrostatic deflection elements, uniform and non-uniform magnetic sector fields, image aberrations, and, finally, fringe field confinement. A chapter on applications is added.

Keywords

Electron beams Electron spectrometry Ion-beam optics Mass spectroscopy design optics spectroscopy surface analysis

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.Surface Physics DivisionMax Planck Institute for Plasma PhysicsGarching/Munich

Bibliographic information

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Reviews

From the reviews:

"This is a short book (128 pages) and follows the course notes of Liebl’s lecture: it is ‘intended to help physicists who have to design their own apparatus or to help them to better understand instruments they have to work with.’ … There are numerous clear diagrams and the book succeeds in its modest aim: to get beginners started in a fairly painless fashion." (Ultramicroscopy, Vol. 108, 2008)

"Book on charged particle optics will primarily be of interest to specialists in that field. … The presentation is commendably clear and readily accessible to anyone with a good knowledge of physics at degree level. … It will also be a fruitful source of examples of the application of electromagnetic theory to charged particles for those preparing lecture courses in the subject for physics degrees." (Richard Carter, Contemporary Physics, Vol. 50 (2), March-April, 2009)