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Detection of Optical and Infrared Radiation

  • Robert H. Kingston

Part of the Springer Series in Optical Sciences book series (SSOS, volume 10)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-VIII
  2. Robert H. Kingston
    Pages 1-9
  3. Robert H. Kingston
    Pages 10-23
  4. Robert H. Kingston
    Pages 24-38
  5. Robert H. Kingston
    Pages 43-51
  6. Robert H. Kingston
    Pages 52-82
  7. Robert H. Kingston
    Pages 83-100
  8. Robert H. Kingston
    Pages 101-104
  9. Robert H. Kingston
    Pages 105-109
  10. Robert H. Kingston
    Pages 110-120
  11. Robert H. Kingston
    Pages 121-136
  12. Back Matter
    Pages 137-142

About this book

Introduction

This text treats the fundamentals of optical and infrared detection in terms of the behavior of the radiation field, the physical properties of the detector, and the statistical behavior of the detector output. Both incoherent and coherent detection are treated in a unified manner, after which selected applications are analyzed, following an analysis of atmospheric effects and signal statistics. The material was developed during a one-semester course at M.I.T. in 1975, revised and presented again in 1976 at Lincoln Laboratory, and rewritten for publication in 1977. Chapter 1 reviews the derivation of Planck's thermal radiation law and also presents several fundamental concepts used throughout the text. These include the three thermal distribution laws (Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, Bose­ Einstein), spontaneous and stimulated emission, and the definition and counting of electromagnetic modes of space. Chapter 2 defines and analyzes the perfect photon detector and calculates the ultimate sensitivity in the presence of thermal radiation. In Chapter 3, we turn from incoherent or power detection to coherent or heterodyne detection and use the concept of orthogonal spatial modes to explain the antenna theorem and the mixing theorem. Chapters 4 through 6 then present a detailed analysis of the sensitivity of vacuum and semiconductor detectors, including the effects of amplifier noise.

Keywords

Albert Einstein Strahlungsempfänger atmospheric effects behavior distribution electromagnetic noise photon radiation semiconductor

Authors and affiliations

  • Robert H. Kingston
    • 1
  1. 1.Lincoln LaboratoryMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyLexingtonUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-35948-7
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1978
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-662-15830-2
  • Online ISBN 978-3-540-35948-7
  • Series Print ISSN 0342-4111
  • Series Online ISSN 1556-1534
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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