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© 2018

Logics for Computer Science

Classical and Non-Classical

  • Offers a comprehensive, intuitive understanding of different logics and discusses some of their applications to Computer Science, and also makes readers understand the need of, and existence of Symbolic Logic as a scientific field

  • Book chapters are as self-contained as possible so that they can be combined in different sequences depending of the level of a course one wants to teach it and of material one wants to teach, whether in Computer Science, Mathematics, or Artificial Intelligence

  • Includes long intuitive introductions to each chapter, many detailed examples explaining each of the introduced notions and definitions, and well-chosen sets of exercises with carefully written solutions. It also contains samples of quizzes and tests after each chapter

  • Includes links to the author's companion lecture slides for each chapter: several hundred presentations which summarize the ideas presented in the chapters for ease of comprehension

Textbook

Table of contents

About this book

Introduction

The theory of computation is based on concepts defined by logicians and mathematicians. Logic plays a fundamental role in computer science, and this book explains the basic theorems, as well as different techniques of proving them in classical and some non-classical logics. Important applications derived from concepts of logic for computer technology include Artificial Intelligence and Software Engineering. 

Providing an in-depth introduction to fundamental classical and non-classical logics, this textbook offers a comprehensive survey of logics for computer scientists. Logics for Computer Science contains intuitive introductory chapters  explaining the  need for logical investigations, motivations for different types of logics  and some of their history. They are followed by strict  formal approach chapters. All chapters contain many detailed examples explaining each of the introduced notions and definitions, well chosen sets of exercises with carefully written solutions, and sets of homework. 

Includes links to the author's companion lecture slides for each chapter: several hundred presentations which summarize the ideas presented in the chapters for ease of comprehension.

Keywords

Symbolic logic propositional languages predicate languages classical semantics non-classical semantics intuitionistic logic modal logics Hilbert style formalizations Gentzen style formalizations automated theorem proving Formal methods completeness theorem Godel Theorems many-valued logics Boolean algebras

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceStony Brook UniversityStony BrookUSA

About the authors

Professor Anita Wasilewska has been teaching a "logic for computer science" class for many years, using presentation slides for ease of comprehension. She earned her Master Degree in Computer Science and Ph.D. in Mathematics from Warsaw University, where she consequently was a faculty of the Mathematics Department from 1967 to 1983. She came to the United States in 1980 as a visiting Assistant Professor in Mathematics at Wesleyan and Yale Universities in Connecticut, before joining Stony Brook’s Department of Computer Science in 1986.

She has also published papers, books, and edited books in many domains ranging from Classical and Non-Classical Logics, Automated Theorem Proving, Formal Languages, Theory of Programs, Foundations of Rough Sets in which she was one of the pioneers, to generalized Fuzzy and Rough sets, and Machine Learning. 



Bibliographic information

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Reviews

“This textbook is intended to serve as a first introduction to logic for undergraduate students, especially for those majoring in computer science or a related field. … The text is very reader-friendly, with plenty of explanations. … The problems will provide readers with ample opportunity to hone their skills.” (Katalin Bimbó, Mathematical Reviews, October, 2019)