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© 2019

Mapping Migration, Identity, and Space

  • Tabea Linhard
  • Timothy H. Parsons
Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xv
  2. Tabea Linhard, Timothy H. Parsons
    Pages 1-20
  3. Maribel Casas-Cortés, Sebastián Cobarrubias, John Pickles
    Pages 257-281
  4. Back Matter
    Pages 357-364

About this book

Introduction

This interdisciplinary collection of essays focuses on the ways in which movements of people across natural, political, and cultural boundaries shape identities that are inexorably linked to the geographical space that individuals on the move cross, inhabit, and leave behind. As conflicts over identities and space continue to erupt on a regular basis, this book reads the relationship between migration, identity, and space from a fresh and innovative perspective.

Tabea Linhard is Professor of Spanish, Comparative Literature, and International Studies at Washington University in St. Louis, USA.

Timothy H. Parsons holds a joint appointment as Professor of African History in the History Department and the African and African American Studies Department at Washington University in St. Louis, USA.

Keywords

conflicts over identities and space migration and identity cultural geography place and space border zones and border crossings state boundaries and internal boundaries

Editors and affiliations

  • Tabea Linhard
    • 1
  • Timothy H. Parsons
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Romance Languages and LiteraturesWashington UniversitySt. Louis, MOUSA
  2. 2.Department of HistoryWashington UniversitySt. Louis, MOUSA

About the editors

Tabea Linhard is Professor of Spanish, Comparative Literature, and International Studies at Washington University in St. Louis, USA.

Timothy H. Parsons holds a joint appointment as Professor of African History in the History Department and the African and African American Studies Department at Washington University in St. Louis, USA.


Bibliographic information

Reviews

“This is a good introduction to a broad range of topics involving migration, as well as a diving board for deeper discussion. It’s best suited for humanities and social sciences scholars, students, and those interested in the research of and application of maps and geography to the titular topics. Mapping Migration, Identity, and Space would make a great course reading or textbook, but is also fascinating as a way to brush up on history and the various ways it can be interpreted.” (base line, Vol. 40 (3), June, 2019)