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© 2017

Veronica Forrest-Thomson

Poet on the Periphery

Book

Part of the Modern and Contemporary Poetry and Poetics book series (MPCC)

Table of contents

About this book

Introduction

This study offers a comprehensive examination of the work of the young poet and scholar, Veronica Forrest-Thomson (1947-1975) in the context of a literary-critical revolution of the late sixties and seventies and evaluates her work against contemporary debates in poetry and poetics. Gareth Farmer explores Forrest-Thomson’s relationship to the conflicting models of literary criticism in the twentieth century such as the close-reading models of F.R Leavis and William Empson, postructuralist models, and the work of Ludwig Wittgenstein.  Written by the leading scholar on Forrest-Thomson’s work, this study explores Forrest-Thomson’s published work as well as unpublished materials from the Veronica Forrest-Thomson Archive. Drawing on close readings of Forrest-Thomson’s writings, this study argues that her work enables us reevaluate literary-critical history and suggests new paradigms for the literary aesthetics and poetics of the future.

Keywords

French structuralism twentieth-century British literary studies F. R. Leavis William Empson poststructuralism models of language debates on twentieth-century poetic form Ludwig Wittgenstein Donald Davie Veronica Forrest-Thomson and literary debate theoretics of poetry Poetic Artifice: A Theory of Twentieth-Century Poetry women in literary tradition twentieth-century female poet female modernist poet Dada Influence of nineteenth-century poetry on modernists Stéphane Mallarmé’s poetic convention

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.University of BedfordshireLutonUnited Kingdom

About the authors

Gareth Farmer is Lecturer in English Literature at the University of Bedfordshire, UK and a poet. He has written essays on a range of modern and contemporary experimental writers and on literary and critical theory. He is the Senior Academic Consultant to the Veronica Forrest-Thomson Archive at Girton College Library, Cambridge.

Bibliographic information