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The Politics of Wellbeing

Theory, Policy and Practice

  • Ian Bache
  • Karen Scott

Part of the Wellbeing in Politics and Policy book series (WPP)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-ix
  2. Ian Bache, Karen Scott
    Pages 1-22
  3. Political Theory and Wellbeing

  4. Wellbeing: A Force for Political Change?

  5. Between Wellbeing Policy and Everyday Lives: Critical Perspectives

  6. Back Matter
    Pages 301-310

About this book

Introduction

This volume is the first collection in the field of wellbeing studies that places politics centre stage. Through a combination of intellectual inquiry, empirically-grounded research, and investigation across different settings, this book aims to provide fresh insights and develop new lenses through which to understand the rise and significance of the wellbeing agenda. Divided into three parts, it considers how to define wellbeing for public policy; the prospects for wellbeing as a force for political change; and the link between policy agendas and the everyday lives of people. The book explores the key political issues of power, democracy, and the legitimacy of wellbeing evidence in a range of settings – international, national and subnational/substate. The volume will appeal to wellbeing and politics scholars, as well as students and general readers with an interest in these new political agendas.


Keywords

wellbeing and policy the wellbeing agenda hedonic and eudaimonic happiness social indicator movement social inequalities CMEPSP OECD Better Life index UN Sustainable Development Goals politics of wellbeing the Capabilities Approach Invention of Happiness Theory-neutral Approach subjective wellbeing progressives alternative wellbeing indicators societal wellbeing measuring wellbeing skivers strivers and thrivers education politics of wellbeing welfare reforms

Editors and affiliations

  • Ian Bache
    • 1
  • Karen Scott
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PoliticsUniversity of SheffieldSheffieldUnited Kingdom
  2. 2.Department of PoliticsUniversity of ExeterPenrynUnited Kingdom

Bibliographic information