Advertisement

© 2018

Chocolate, Politics and Peace-Building

An Ethnography of the Peace Community of San José de Apartadó, Colombia

Book

Part of the Studies of the Americas book series (STAM)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxviii
  2. Origins

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 37-37
    2. Gwen Burnyeat
      Pages 39-65
    3. Gwen Burnyeat
      Pages 67-94
    4. Gwen Burnyeat
      Pages 95-109
  3. Part II

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 111-112
    2. Gwen Burnyeat
      Pages 113-148
    3. Gwen Burnyeat
      Pages 149-172
  4. Part III

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 173-175
    2. Gwen Burnyeat
      Pages 177-200
    3. Gwen Burnyeat
      Pages 201-229
  5. Back Matter
    Pages 245-263

About this book

Introduction

This book tells the story of the Peace Community of San José de Apartadó, an emblematic grassroots social movement of peasant farmers, who unusually declared themselves ‘neutral’ to Colombia’s internal armed conflict, in the north-west region of Urabá. It reveals two core narratives in the Community’s collective identity, which Burnyeat calls the ‘radical’ and the ‘organic’ narratives. These refer to the historically-constituted interpretative frameworks according to which they perceive respectively the Colombian state, and their relationship with their natural and social environments. Together, these two narratives form an ‘Alternative Community’ collective identity, comprising a distinctive conception of grassroots peace-building. This study, centered on the Community’s socio-economic cacao-farming project, offers an innovative way of approaching victims’ organizations and social movements through critical, post-modern politics and anthropology. It will become essential reading to Latin American ethnographers and historians, and all interested in conflict resolution and transitional justice.

Gwen Burnyeat is a Wolfson PhD Scholar in Anthropology at University College London, UK. She has worked in Colombia for eight years, has a Masters from the Universidad Nacional de Colombia where she also lectured in Political Anthropology, and her prize-winning documentary ‘Chocolate of Peace’ was released in 2016 (www.chocolateofpeace.com).

Keywords

Urabá neutrality narratives anthropology of the state Colombian peace process cocoa farmers social movements victims cacao materiality

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.University College LondonLondonUK

About the authors

Gwen Burnyeat is a Wolfson PhD Scholar in Anthropology at University College London, UK. She has worked in Colombia for eight years, has a Masters from the Universidad Nacional de Colombia where she also lectured in Political Anthropology, and her prize-winning documentary ‘Chocolate of Peace’ was released in 2016 (see http://chocolatedepaz.com/english for a trailer).

Bibliographic information

Reviews

“The book as a whole remains a fascinating and well-researched exploration of resistance against terrible odds. Thoughtful and well documented, it is an indispensable addition to the body of ethnographic work on political conflict in what continues to be a violent and deeply polarised polity.” (Nick Morgan, Journal of Latin American Studies, Vol. 52 (2), 2020)

“While the book centres on the politics of chocolate in the midst of Colombia’s war, it is also about much more. Chocolate, politics and peace-building is an important rumination on one of the most high-profile community-based attempts to create peace in Colombia amidst structural forces that pull towards violence. Burnyeat’s ethnography is as urgent as ever now that much of the country is living in a tattered peace, hounded by similar structural forces.” (Alexander L. Fattal, Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Vol. 26 (2), 2020)

“Burnyeat’s sophisticated, grounded approach and valuable research about peace communities and sustainability will contribute to future discussions about the state, the importance of Community members’ identity narratives, and how to achieve sustainable, positive peace.” (Suzanne Wilson, Maguaré, Vol. 33 (2), 2019)