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© 2017

Higher Education under Late Capitalism

Identity, Conduct, and the Neoliberal Condition

Book

Part of the New Frontiers in Education, Culture, and Politics book series (NFECP)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxvii
  2. Jeffrey R. Di Leo
    Pages 1-21
  3. Jeffrey R. Di Leo
    Pages 23-48
  4. Jeffrey R. Di Leo
    Pages 49-62
  5. Jeffrey R. Di Leo
    Pages 63-75
  6. Jeffrey R. Di Leo
    Pages 77-91
  7. Jeffrey R. Di Leo
    Pages 93-108
  8. Jeffrey R. Di Leo
    Pages 109-122
  9. Jeffrey R. Di Leo
    Pages 123-138
  10. Jeffrey R. Di Leo
    Pages 139-163
  11. Back Matter
    Pages 165-193

About this book

Introduction

This book explores questions concerning personal identity and individual conduct within neoliberal academe. The author suggests that neoliberal academe is normal academe in the new millennium though well aware of its contested nature and destructive capacities. Examining higher education through a number of ideals, such as austerity and transparency, brings readers on a journey into its present as well as its past. If some of these ideals can be identified and critiqued, there is a chance that the foundations of neoliberal academe can be weakened. This book actively pursues pathways out of the neoliberal abyss--and offers that demanding a role for pleasure in higher education may be one of them.

Keywords

neoliberalism personal identity and individual conduct in neoliberal academe austerity transparency Jeremy Bentham Pierre Bourdieu academic habitus

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.School of Arts and SciencesUniversity of Houston-VictoriaVictoriaUSA

About the authors

Jeffrey R. Di Leo is Dean of Arts and Sciences and Professor of English and Philosophy at the University of Houston-Victoria, USA.

Bibliographic information

  • Book Title Higher Education under Late Capitalism
  • Book Subtitle Identity, Conduct, and the Neoliberal Condition
  • Authors Jeffrey R. Di Leo
  • Series Title New Frontiers in Education, Culture, and Politics
  • Series Abbreviated Title New Frontiers in Education, Culture, and Politics
  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49858-4
  • Copyright Information The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2017
  • Publisher Name Palgrave Macmillan, Cham
  • eBook Packages Education Education (R0)
  • Hardcover ISBN 978-3-319-49857-7
  • Softcover ISBN 978-3-319-84258-5
  • eBook ISBN 978-3-319-49858-4
  • Edition Number 1
  • Number of Pages XXVII, 193
  • Number of Illustrations 0 b/w illustrations, 0 illustrations in colour
  • Topics Higher Education
    Educational Policy and Politics
    Educational Philosophy
    Philosophy of Education
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
Industry Sectors
Finance, Business & Banking

Reviews

“In his brilliant book, Di Leo creates a new language and mode of critique to understand the ideas, social relations, desires, values, and forms of agency that imprint neoliberalism with a sense of normalcy.  This book offers up a new way to reclaim not a romanticized university of the past but one that serves the present and future as an institution for democracy, justice, critical inquiry, and social responsibility. A must read in dark times.” (Henry A. Giroux, University Professor for Scholarship in the Public Interest, McMaster University, Canada)

“This important book’s major contribution is to promote workable standards, challenging the reigning system, which would turn neoliberalism against itself. Filled with brilliant readings of intellectual classics, recent educational Jeremiads, and contemporary popular culture, this book will be a classic guide for those who would transform the new normal.” (Daniel T. O’Hara, Professor of English and Mellon Professor of Humanities, Temple University, USA)

“Di Leo offers a prescient critique of the recasting of higher education by neoliberal prerogatives. Much more than simply describing the crisis or bemoaning the lineaments of austerity, this book explores the basis for resistance and change in academe. For those of us concerned about the future of the university, this should be required reading.” (Peter Hitchcock, Professor of English, City University of New York, USA)