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© 2016

Resources, Services and Risks

How Can Data Observatories Bridge The Science-Policy Divide in Environmental Governance?

Book

Part of the SpringerBriefs in Environmental Science book series (BRIEFSENVIRONMENTAL)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xii
  2. Mathew Kurian, Reza Ardakanian, Linda Gonçalves Veiga, Kristin Meyer
    Pages 1-3
  3. Mathew Kurian, Reza Ardakanian, Linda Gonçalves Veiga, Kristin Meyer
    Pages 5-30
  4. Mathew Kurian, Reza Ardakanian, Linda Gonçalves Veiga, Kristin Meyer
    Pages 31-49
  5. Mathew Kurian, Reza Ardakanian, Linda Gonçalves Veiga, Kristin Meyer
    Pages 51-75
  6. Mathew Kurian, Reza Ardakanian, Linda Gonçalves Veiga, Kristin Meyer
    Pages E1-E1

About this book

Introduction

This book discusses the role of observatories in supporting evidence-based decision-making. The book focuses on issues of data accessibility, monitoring frameworks and governance processes with regard to environmental resources – water, soil and waste. This publication highlights challenges related to policy-implementation measures and examines current monitoring approaches, and illustrates how the UNU-FLORES Nexus Observatory seeks to overcome concerns related to data, monitoring and governance of water, soil and waste resources. In particular, given that extreme weather events such as droughts and floods are predicted to become more frequent in the future, it discusses the need for improved hazard risk monitoring. It proposes risk indices for drought and floods, which measure exposure and vulnerability to the phenomena through a multitude of bio-physical, socio-economic and institutional indicators. Furthermore, the potential for using openly accessible data made available through observatories in decision-making aimed at improving food security is also discussed. It acknowledges governments as key players in environmental resource management, and recognizes that decentralization reforms, as well as the emergence of information and communication technologies, have significantly changed the role of governments in promoting sustainable development. The book is particularly relevant for decision-makers, donor agencies, practitioners and students with an interest in environmental management who are also keen followers of discussions on the post-2015 monitoring agenda.

Keywords

Decentralization reforms Environmental resource management Food security improvement Improved hazard risk monitoring Natural disaster risk management Nexus Observatory Water point mapping

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.UNU-FLORESDresdenGermany
  2. 2.United Nations University Institute forDresdenGermany
  3. 3.School of Economics and Management and NUniversity of MinhoBragaPortugal
  4. 4.UNU-FLORESDresdenGermany

About the authors

Prof. Dr. Reza Ardakanian is the Founding Director of United Nations University Institute for Integrated Management of Material Fluxes and of Resources (UNU-FLORES^ry of Interior (1987–1989).

Dr. Mathew Kurian is Academic Officer and leads the Capacity Development and Governance unit at United Nations University Institute for Integrated Management of Material Fluxes and of Resources (UNU-FLORES). Prior to joining UNU-FLORES, he served as Senior Water and Sanitation Specialist at Water and Sanitation Programme (WSP) of The World Bank where he led policy advocacy efforts related to rural water supply, wastewater reuse, and climate adaptation options in secondary towns. He began his career as a Robert McNamara Fellow at the World Bank where his work on land tenure reform was hosted by the Tata Energy Research Institute (TERI), New Delhi.

 

Upon completing his PhD in Development Studies from the Institute of Social Studies (ISS), Erasmus University, The Hague, Netherlands, Dr. Kurian was employed as Associate Expert (Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs) at International Water Management Institute (IWMI-CGIAR) where he undertook assessments of soil and water conservation interventions in the Mekong and Nile river basins. In 2009 as member of faculty at UNESCO-IHE, Delft, Dr. Kurian led the development of a policy note on urban sanitation and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for the Directorate General of International Cooperation (DGIS) in the Netherlands. While still at UNESCO-IHE, Dr. Kurian developed an online e-learning course on governance of water and sanitation services in developing countries.

 

He has published in the area of water institutions and policy and has mentored students of the MSc programme in environment and development planning while on the faculty of University College London (UCL). His experience in the field of capacity development includes training civil servants and managers of water utilities in Iran and Tanzania, consulting assignments with the Asian Development Bank (ADB), Philippines and teaching undergraduate courses in human geography at the University of British Columbia (UBC) Vancouver, Canada. In his current function, he leads the design of public policy research, policy advocacy in support of evidence-based decision making and fund raising to support establishment of a nexus observatory network.

Kristin Meyer is a Research Assistant in the Capacity Development and Governance Unit at United Nations University Institute for Integrated Management of Material Fluxes and of Resources (UNU-FLORES)ition: initial; background-size: initial; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial;">. Her work includes research on governance and evidence-based decision-making, as well as involvement in the development of the Nexus Observatory concept and platform. Prior to joining UNU-FLORES, she worked with the Delegation of the European Union to the UN in New York tracking and analysing human rights resolutions on the situation in Myanmar and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and engaging with UN agencies, civil society organisations, and other missions. Ms. Meyer previously served as a consultant for the UK National Team of Higher Education Reform Experts, where she sensitised stakeholders to and advanced implementation of issues concerning the European Higher Education Area, including student mobility, quality assurance, and academic accreditation. Ms. Meyer received her LL.M. in Public International Law from the University of Nottingham and completed her Bachelor of Laws at the University of Sheffield.

 

 

Bibliographic information

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