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© 2016

Spectroscopy and Optical Diagnostics for Gases

Textbook

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxv
  2. Ronald K. Hanson, R. Mitchell Spearrin, Christopher S. Goldenstein
    Pages 1-8
  3. Ronald K. Hanson, R. Mitchell Spearrin, Christopher S. Goldenstein
    Pages 9-49
  4. Ronald K. Hanson, R. Mitchell Spearrin, Christopher S. Goldenstein
    Pages 51-57
  5. Ronald K. Hanson, R. Mitchell Spearrin, Christopher S. Goldenstein
    Pages 59-78
  6. Ronald K. Hanson, R. Mitchell Spearrin, Christopher S. Goldenstein
    Pages 79-90
  7. Ronald K. Hanson, R. Mitchell Spearrin, Christopher S. Goldenstein
    Pages 91-105
  8. Ronald K. Hanson, R. Mitchell Spearrin, Christopher S. Goldenstein
    Pages 107-129
  9. Ronald K. Hanson, R. Mitchell Spearrin, Christopher S. Goldenstein
    Pages 131-148
  10. Ronald K. Hanson, R. Mitchell Spearrin, Christopher S. Goldenstein
    Pages 149-159
  11. Ronald K. Hanson, R. Mitchell Spearrin, Christopher S. Goldenstein
    Pages 161-175
  12. Ronald K. Hanson, R. Mitchell Spearrin, Christopher S. Goldenstein
    Pages 177-199
  13. Ronald K. Hanson, R. Mitchell Spearrin, Christopher S. Goldenstein
    Pages 201-215
  14. Ronald K. Hanson, R. Mitchell Spearrin, Christopher S. Goldenstein
    Pages 217-225
  15. Ronald K. Hanson, R. Mitchell Spearrin, Christopher S. Goldenstein
    Pages 227-253
  16. Back Matter
    Pages 255-279

About this book

Introduction

This text provides an introduction to the science that governs the interaction of light and matter (in the gas phase). It provides readers with the basic knowledge to exploit the light-matter interaction to develop quantitative tools for gas analysis (i.e. optical diagnostics) and understand and interpret the results of spectroscopic measurements. The authors pair the basics of gas‐phase spectroscopy with coverage of key optical diagnostic techniques utilized by practicing engineers and scientists to measure fundamental flow‐field properties. The text is organized to cover three sub‐topics of gas‐phase spectroscopy: (1) spectral line positions, (2) spectral line strengths, and (3) spectral lineshapes by way of absorption, emission, and scattering interactions. The latter part of the book describes optical measurement techniques and equipment. Key subspecialties include laser induced fluorescence, tunable laser absorption spectroscopy, and wavelength modulation spectroscopy. It is ideal for students and practitioners across a range of applied sciences including mechanical, aerospace, chemical, and materials engineering.

Keywords

Applied spectroscopy Gas‐phase spectroscopy Laser diagnostics Laser spectroscopy Optical diagnostics Spectroscopy Spectroscopy of gases

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.Dept. of Mechanical EngineeringStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Los Angeles (UCLA) University of CaliforniaMechanical and Aerospace Engineering DepLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Purdue UniversitySchool of Mechanical EngineeringWest LafayetteUSA

About the authors

Ronald K. Hanson is the Woodard Professor of Mechanical Engineering at
Stanford University. Prof. Hanson has been actively involved in teaching and applied
spectroscopy research at the High TemperatureGasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford
for over 40 years, resulting in over 95 Ph.Ds being awarded under his supervision.
The Hanson research group has published over 1000 technical papers, contributing
to many advances in optical diagnostics, and also shock wave physics, chemical
kinetics, combustion science and advanced propulsion. Co-authors Dr. Mitchell
Spearrin and Dr. Christopher Goldenstein are former students of Prof. Hanson’s
research group.

R. Mitchell Spearrin is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace
Engineering at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). Prof. Spearrin’s
research focuses on spectroscopy and optical sensors with experimental application
to dynamic flow fields in aerospace, energy, and biomedical systems.

Christopher S. Goldenstein is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering
at Purdue University. Prof. Goldenstein’s research focuses on the development and
application of laser-based sensors for studying energetic materials, energy systems,
and trace gases.

Bibliographic information

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