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© 2020

Regulating Telecommunications in South Africa

Universal Access and Service

Book

Part of the Information Technology and Global Governance book series (ITGG)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xvii
  2. Charley Lewis
    Pages 1-22
  3. Charley Lewis
    Pages 127-170
  4. Charley Lewis
    Pages 171-216
  5. Charley Lewis
    Pages 217-258
  6. Charley Lewis
    Pages 259-298
  7. Charley Lewis
    Pages 299-333
  8. Back Matter
    Pages 335-347

About this book

Introduction

“An original contribution to the fields of both politics, policymaking and telecommunication studies generally, and more specifically in the niche area of internet penetration and universal service and access…A well-researched and consistently interesting study.”

Victoria Graham, Associate Professor of Politics, Philosophy and International Studies, Monash University, South Africa

 “The empirical analysis of these [policy] failures is arresting and important and is a substantial contribution to the scholarly field. I salute Dr. Lewis' powers of observation and analysis.”

Robert B. Horwitz, Professor of Education, the University of California, San Diego, USA.

“The detailed narrative and the development of universal access and service policy in relation to best practice norms is unprecedented...an extraordinarily detailed and rich discussion…”

Ahmed Veriava, Lecturer in the Department of Political Studies, the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa 

This book provides the first full account of the 20-year story of universal access and service in South Africa’s ICT sector. From 1994 the country’s first democratic government set out to redress the deep digital divide afflicting the overwhelming majority of its citizens, already poor and disenfranchised, but likewise marginalised in access to telephone infrastructure and services. By this time, an incipient global policy regime was driving reforms in the telecomms sector, and also developing good practice models for universal service. Policy diffusion thus led South Africa to adopt, adapt and implement a slew of these interventions. In particular, roll-out obligations were imposed on licensees, and a universal service fund was established. But an agency with a universal service mandate was also created; and licences in under-serviced areas were awarded. The book goes on to identify and analyse the policy success and failure of each of these interventions, and suggests some lessons to be learned. 

Charley Lewis is an independent analyst, researcher and educator, covering the broad field of ICT policy and regulation.

Keywords

Universal Access Universal Service International Telecommunication Union World Trade Organisation Office for Communications Ofcom Digital Divide Telecom Reform South Africa South Africa's ICT transition Policy Diffusion Policy Failure telecommunications telecomms technology in africa telephony internet access network SAPT apartheid

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.Fish HoekSouth Africa

About the authors

Charley Lewis is an independent analyst, researcher and educator, covering the broad field of ICT policy and regulation. A former high-school teacher, computer programmer, trade unionist, and, later, a university academic, he retains an abiding passion for universal access and service. 

Bibliographic information

  • Book Title Regulating Telecommunications in South Africa
  • Book Subtitle Universal Access and Service
  • Authors Charley Lewis
  • Series Title Information Technology and Global Governance
  • Series Abbreviated Title Information Technology and Global Governance
  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-43527-1
  • Copyright Information The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020
  • Publisher Name Palgrave Macmillan, Cham
  • eBook Packages Political Science and International Studies Political Science and International Studies (R0)
  • Hardcover ISBN 978-3-030-43526-4
  • Softcover ISBN 978-3-030-43529-5
  • eBook ISBN 978-3-030-43527-1
  • Edition Number 1
  • Number of Pages XVII, 347
  • Number of Illustrations 4 b/w illustrations, 15 illustrations in colour
  • Topics Public Policy
    African Politics
    Development Policy
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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Reviews

“An original contribution to the fields of both politics, policymaking and telecommunication studies generally, and more specifically in the niche area of internet penetration and universal service and access…A wellresearched and consistently interesting study.”

Victoria Graham, Associate Professor of Politics, Philosophy and International Studies, Monash University, South Africa


 “The empirical analysis of these [policy] failures is arresting and important and is a substantial contribution to the scholarly field. I salute Dr. Lewis' powers of observation and analysis”

Robert B. Horwitz, Professor of Education, the University of California, San Diego, USA


“Regulating Telecommunications in South Africa is a shrewd, critical and engagingly written overview of the deep digital donga that separated ‘white’ and ‘black’ South Africa in the immediate aftermath of apartheid. Charley Lewis showcases his in-depth knowledge of universal access service initiatives around the world, their successes and failures and their impact on the South African regulatory environment. In this book, he manages to provide historical context for a topic that remains highly contentious in contemporary (South) Africa, and also succeeds in balancing local responses to global best practice in a manner that uplifts the voice of the resource poor without condescension. This is a master feat.”

Viola C. Milton, Professor, University of South Africa, South Africa


“The detailed narrative and the development of universal access and service policy in relation to best practice norms is unprecedented...an extraordinarily detailed and rich discussion…”

Ahmed Veriava, Lecturer in the Department of Political Studies, the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa