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© 2020

Hendrik de Man and Social Democracy

The Idea of Planning in Western Europe, 1914–1940

Book

Part of the Palgrave Studies in the History of Social Movements book series (PSHSM)

Table of contents

About this book

Introduction

'Thought-provoking and lucid, this engaging book is a timely new analysis of the influence of Hendrik de Man on the development of interwar social democracy in Europe.’

Heather Jones, University College London, UK

‘A fluently written and deeply-researched assessment of one of the most influential socialist thinkers of the twentieth century. Milani writes authoritatively and with an extraordinary command of the sources. He tells the story not just of a major (albeit flawed) leader, but of the entire European socialist movement across a pivotal period.’

David Stevenson, London School of Economics and Political Science, UK

The book investigates the intellectual and political trajectory of the Belgian theorist Hendrik de Man (1885-1953) by examining the impact that his works and activism had on Western European social democracy between the two world wars. Based on multinational archival research, the book highlights how the idea of economic planning became part of a wider effort to address an ideological crisis within the socialist movement and revitalise the latter amidst the Great Depression. A heavily controversial figure also because of his subsequent involvement in Belgian wartime collaboration, de Man played a pivotal role in challenging traditional Marxist assumptions about the role of the state under capitalism and in promoting transnational exchanges between unorthodox social democrats across Europe. Starting from de Man’s experience in World War I, the book analyses his departure from Marxism, his elaboration of an alternative social democratic paradigm, his entry in Belgian politics as well as the reception of his thought in France and Britain.

Keywords

Economic planning Political left Transnational history Interwar period Belgium France Germany Italy Britain Socialist thought Marxism European socialism Economic downturn Great Depression

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.OxfordUK

About the authors

Tommaso Milani is a teaching fellow in European and International History at Sciences Po Paris, France. He was formerly a college lecturer in Modern European History at Balliol College, University of Oxford, UK, and earned his PhD in International History from the London School of Economics and Political Science, UK, in 2017.   

Bibliographic information

  • Book Title Hendrik de Man and Social Democracy
  • Book Subtitle The Idea of Planning in Western Europe, 1914–1940
  • Authors Tommaso Milani
  • Series Title Palgrave Studies in the History of Social Movements
  • Series Abbreviated Title Palgrave Studies in the History of Social Movements
  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-42534-0
  • Copyright Information The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020
  • Publisher Name Palgrave Macmillan, Cham
  • eBook Packages History History (R0)
  • Hardcover ISBN 978-3-030-42533-3
  • Softcover ISBN 978-3-030-42536-4
  • eBook ISBN 978-3-030-42534-0
  • Edition Number 1
  • Number of Pages XVI, 329
  • Number of Illustrations 1 b/w illustrations, 0 illustrations in colour
  • Topics History of Modern Europe
    Social History
    Political History
    World History, Global and Transnational History
  • Buy this book on publisher's site

Reviews

“Thought-provoking and lucid, this engaging book is a timely new analysis of the influence of Hendrik de Man on the development of interwar social democracy in Europe.” (Heather Jones, University College London, UK)

“A fluently written and deeply-researched assessment of one of the most influential socialist thinkers of the twentieth century. Milani writes authoritatively and with an extraordinary command of the sources. He tells the story not just of a major (albeit flawed) leader, but of the entire European socialist movement across a pivotal period.” (David Stevenson, London School of Economics and Political Science, UK)