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© 2020

Understanding Quantum Mechanics

The World According to Modern Quantum Foundations

Textbook

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xv
  2. Detlef Dürr, Dustin Lazarovici
    Pages 1-36
  3. Detlef Dürr, Dustin Lazarovici
    Pages 37-48
  4. Detlef Dürr, Dustin Lazarovici
    Pages 49-73
  5. Detlef Dürr, Dustin Lazarovici
    Pages 75-103
  6. Detlef Dürr, Dustin Lazarovici
    Pages 105-115
  7. Detlef Dürr, Dustin Lazarovici
    Pages 117-126
  8. Detlef Dürr, Dustin Lazarovici
    Pages 127-147
  9. Detlef Dürr, Dustin Lazarovici
    Pages 149-160
  10. Detlef Dürr, Dustin Lazarovici
    Pages 161-171
  11. Detlef Dürr, Dustin Lazarovici
    Pages 173-192
  12. Detlef Dürr, Dustin Lazarovici
    Pages 193-216
  13. Detlef Dürr, Dustin Lazarovici
    Pages 217-230
  14. Detlef Dürr, Dustin Lazarovici
    Pages 231-233
  15. Back Matter
    Pages 235-239

About this book

Introduction

This book discusses the physical and mathematical foundations of modern quantum mechanics and three realistic quantum theories that John Stuart Bell called "theories without observers" because they do not merely speak about measurements but develop an objective picture of the physical world. These are Bohmian mechanics, the GRW collapse theory, and the Many Worlds theory. 

The book is ideal to accompany or supplement a lecture course on quantum mechanics, but also suited for self-study, particularly for those who have completed such a course but are left puzzled by the question: "What does the mathematical formalism, which I have so laboriously learned and applied, actually tell us about nature?”


Keywords

Foundations of quantum mechanics Interpretations of quantum mechanics Bohemian mechanics GRW-theory The Many-Worlds Theory Quantum nonlocality Bell inequality Bell´s theorem Born´s rule Quantum Ontology Wavefunction ontology Objective quantum worldview

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.Mathematisches InstitutUniversität MünchenMünchenGermany
  2. 2.Faculté des lettres Section de philosophieUniversité de LausanneLausanneSwitzerland

About the authors

Detlef Dürr studied physics in Münster, Germany, where he obtained his PhD in physics in 1978. After his post-doc years at Rutgers in Joel Lebowitz´s group working with Sheldon Goldstein, he was awarded a Heisenberg fellowship. In 1989 he became a professor of mathematics at the University of Munich. His research interests are non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, Bohmian mechanics and the foundations of quantum theory. 

Dustin Lazarovici studied physics and mathematics at the University of Munich, Germany and earned his PhD in 2015 under the supervision of Detlef Dürr. He is currently working in philosophy of physics at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland.

Bibliographic information

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