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© 2020

Gender, Sexuality, and Intelligence Studies

The Spy in the Closet

Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-x
  2. Mary Manjikian
    Pages 1-17
  3. Mary Manjikian
    Pages 19-66
  4. Mary Manjikian
    Pages 67-99
  5. Mary Manjikian
    Pages 101-142
  6. Mary Manjikian
    Pages 143-188
  7. Mary Manjikian
    Pages 189-218
  8. Mary Manjikian
    Pages 219-262

About this book

Introduction

“Gender, Sexuality, and Intelligence Studies is a bold and ambitious engagement across queer theorizing, critical international relations, and intelligence studies. It stirs up conversations that were previously either ignored or impossible while providing a clear argument and a unique perspective. A reader will not be able to help getting involved in the analysis, sometimes agreeing sometimes arguing. Manjikian brings a strong perspective and impressive familiarity across a wide variety of literatures. A worthwhile read!”

Laura Sjoberg, Associate Professor of Political Science and Women’s Studies, University of Florida, USA

This is the first work to engage with intelligence studies through the lens of queer theory. Adding to the literature in critical intelligence studies and critical international relations theory, this work considers the ways in which both the spy, and the activities of espionage can be viewed as queer. Part One argues that the spy plays a role which represents a third path between the hard power of the military and the soft power of diplomacy. Part Two shows how the intelligence community plays a key role in enabling leaders of democracies to conduct covert activities running counter to that mission and ideology, in this way allowing a leader to have two foreign policies—an overt, public policy and a second, closeted, queer foreign policy.

Mary Manjikian is Professor and Associate Dean at the Robertson School of Government, Regent University, USA. 

Keywords

Queer Intelligence Counterintelligence Covert Activity Gender and Intelligence Gender and sexuality Queer politics Queer International Relations Gender and International Relations Sexuality Gender Intelligence Agent Queerness Queer Performativity Homosexuality Queer Theory Sexual Politics Queer Behaviour Critical International Relations IR Theory

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.Regent UniversityVirginia BeachUSA

About the authors

Mary Manjikian is Professor and Associate Dean at the Robertson School of Government, Regent University, USA. Her work has appeared in International Studies Quarterly, International Feminist Journal of Politics, Intelligence and National Security and International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence. She is a former US foreign service officer with service in the Netherlands, Russia and Bulgaria.

Bibliographic information

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Reviews

“Mary Manjikian’s Gender, Sexuality, and Intelligence Studies: The Spy in the Closet shines light on the enduring myths that sustain dominant approaches to intelligence studies and international relations scholarship. Manjikian’s volume is the first and only book-length treatment of queer theory within an intelligence context, and it is a much-needed and valuable contribution to the broader project of developing a critical intelligence studies. Readers will find Manjikian’s perspective a useful lens through which to view the dynamics of intelligence organizations, the identity politics of organizational members, and how the institution and practice of intelligence itself occupies a ‘queer space’ in the international relations arena. Queer theory has destabilized foundational assumptions across many academic fields, and Manjikian’s intervention delivers a timely, useful, and important jolt to intelligence studies.”

Hamilton Bean, Associate Professor of Communication and Director of the International Studies Program, University of Colorado Denver, USA

“Gender, Sexuality, and Intelligence Studies is a bold and ambitious engagement across queer theorizing, critical international relations, and intelligence studies. It stirs up conversations that were previously either ignored or impossible while providing a clear argument and a unique perspective. A reader will not be able to help getting involved in the analysis, sometimes agreeing sometimes arguing. Manjikian brings a strong perspective and impressive familiarity across a wide variety of literatures. A worthwhile read!”

—Laura Sjoberg, Associate Professor, Political Science and Women’s Studies, University of Florida, USA