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Learning in Information-Rich Environments

I-LEARN and the Construction of Knowledge from Information

  • Delia Neuman
  • Mary Jean Tecce DeCarlo
  • Vera J. Lee
  • Stacey Greenwell
  • Allen Grant
Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xviii
  2. Delia Neuman, Mary Jean Tecce DeCarlo, Vera J. Lee, Stacey Greenwell, Allen Grant
    Pages 1-18
  3. Delia Neuman, Mary Jean Tecce DeCarlo, Vera J. Lee, Stacey Greenwell, Allen Grant
    Pages 19-40
  4. Delia Neuman, Mary Jean Tecce DeCarlo, Vera J. Lee, Stacey Greenwell, Allen Grant
    Pages 41-62
  5. Delia Neuman, Mary Jean Tecce DeCarlo, Vera J. Lee, Stacey Greenwell, Allen Grant
    Pages 63-91
  6. Delia Neuman, Mary Jean Tecce DeCarlo, Vera J. Lee, Stacey Greenwell, Allen Grant
    Pages 93-117
  7. Delia Neuman, Mary Jean Tecce DeCarlo, Vera J. Lee, Stacey Greenwell, Allen Grant
    Pages 119-153
  8. Delia Neuman, Mary Jean Tecce DeCarlo, Vera J. Lee, Stacey Greenwell, Allen Grant
    Pages 155-173
  9. Delia Neuman, Mary Jean Tecce DeCarlo, Vera J. Lee, Stacey Greenwell, Allen Grant
    Pages 175-203
  10. Back Matter
    Pages 205-217

About this book

Introduction

The amount and range of information available to today’s students—and indeed to all learners—is unprecedented. If the characteristics of “the information age” demand new conceptions of commerce, national security, and publishing—among other things—it is logical to assume that they carry implications for education as well. Little has been written, however, about how the specific affordances of these technologies—and the kinds of information they allow students to access and create—relate to the central purpose of education: learning. What does “learning” mean in an information-rich environment? What are its characteristics? What kinds of tasks should it involve? What concepts, strategies, attitudes, and skills do educators and students need to master if they are to learn effectively and efficiently in such an environment? How can researchers, theorists, and practitioners foster the well-founded and widespread development of such key elements of the learning process?

This second edition continues these discussions and suggests some tentative answers. Drawing primarily from research and theory in three distinct but related fields—learning theory, instructional systems design, and information studies—it presents a way to think about learning that responds directly to the actualities of a world brimming with information. The second edition also includes insights from digital and critical literacies and provides a combination of an updated research-and-theory base and a collection of instructional scenarios for helping teachers and librarians implement each step of the I-LEARN model. The book could be used in courses in teacher preparation, academic-librarian preparation, and school-librarian preparation.

Keywords

Information Literacy Digital Literacy 21st Century Learning Inquiry-Based Learning Instructional Materials

Authors and affiliations

  • Delia Neuman
    • 1
  • Mary Jean Tecce DeCarlo
    • 2
  • Vera J. Lee
    • 3
  • Stacey Greenwell
    • 4
  • Allen Grant
    • 5
  1. 1.College of Computing and InformaticsDrexel UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.School of EducationDrexel UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.School of EducationDrexel UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA
  4. 4.William T. Young LibraryUniversity of KentuckyLexingtonUSA
  5. 5.School of Education and Professional StudiesSUNY-PotsdamPotsdamUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-29410-6
  • Copyright Information Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019
  • Publisher Name Springer, Cham
  • eBook Packages Education
  • Print ISBN 978-3-030-29409-0
  • Online ISBN 978-3-030-29410-6
  • Buy this book on publisher's site