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Capital and Colonialism

The Return on British Investments in Africa 1869–1969

  • Klas Rönnbäck
  • Oskar Broberg
Book

Part of the Palgrave Studies in Economic History book series (PEHS)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xvi
  2. Klas Rönnbäck, Oskar Broberg
    Pages 1-11
  3. Part I

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 13-15
    2. Klas Rönnbäck, Oskar Broberg
      Pages 17-38
    3. Klas Rönnbäck, Oskar Broberg
      Pages 39-54
    4. Klas Rönnbäck, Oskar Broberg
      Pages 55-68
    5. Klas Rönnbäck, Oskar Broberg
      Pages 69-95
  4. Part II

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 97-99
    2. Klas Rönnbäck, Oskar Broberg
      Pages 101-124
    3. Klas Rönnbäck, Oskar Broberg
      Pages 125-144
  5. Part III

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 145-147
    2. Klas Rönnbäck, Oskar Broberg
      Pages 149-174
    3. Klas Rönnbäck, Oskar Broberg
      Pages 175-207
    4. Klas Rönnbäck, Oskar Broberg
      Pages 209-234
    5. Klas Rönnbäck, Oskar Broberg
      Pages 235-277
  6. Part IV

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 279-281
    2. Klas Rönnbäck, Oskar Broberg
      Pages 283-309
    3. Klas Rönnbäck, Oskar Broberg
      Pages 311-337
    4. Klas Rönnbäck, Oskar Broberg
      Pages 339-377
    5. Klas Rönnbäck, Oskar Broberg
      Pages 379-392
  7. Back Matter
    Pages 393-402

About this book

Introduction

This book engages in the long-standing debate on the relationship between capitalism and colonialism. Specifically, Rönnbäck and Broberg study the interaction between imperialist policies, colonial institutions and financial markets. Their primary method of analysis is examining micro- and macro-level data relating to a large sample of ventures operating in Africa and traded on the London Stock Exchange between 1869 and 1969. Their study shows that the relationship between capital and colonialism was highly complex. While return from investing in African colonies on average was not extraordinary, there were certainly many occasions when investors enjoyed high return due to various forms of exploitation. While there were actors with rational calculations and deliberate strategies, there was also an important element of chance in determining the return on investment – not least in the mining sector, which overall was the most important business for investment in African ventures during this period. This book finally also demonstrates that the different paths of decolonization in Africa had very diverse effects for investors.


Keywords

British Imperialism Education Economics European Investment Industrial Production Plantations Labour Regimes Liberal Economic Theory Foreign Direct Investment Global Mining Industry African Entrepreneurship The City of London Global Financial History Capital Exports London Stock Exchange The Suez Canal Company The British South Africa Company Macro-oriented Financial History Settler Colonisation Non-settler Colonisiation Financial Decolonization

Authors and affiliations

  • Klas Rönnbäck
    • 1
  • Oskar Broberg
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Economy and SocietyUniversity of GothenburgGothenburgSweden
  2. 2.Department of Economy and SocietyUniversity of GothenburgGothenburgSweden

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-19711-7
  • Copyright Information The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2019
  • Publisher Name Palgrave Macmillan, Cham
  • eBook Packages Economics and Finance
  • Print ISBN 978-3-030-19710-0
  • Online ISBN 978-3-030-19711-7
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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