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© 2019

Palestine and Rule of Power

Local Dissent vs. International Governance

  • Alaa Tartir
  • Timothy Seidel
  • Addresses issues of resistance, steadfastness, and mobilization against settler colonialism and repression in Palestine

  • Analyzes impact of neoliberal external intervention and effectiveness of international aid

  • Explores security sector reform and Palestinian authoritarianism

Book

Part of the Middle East Today book series (MIET)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxix
  2. Resistance and Mobilization Against Apartheid, Settler Colonialism, and Repression

  3. External Intervention and International Aid

  4. Security Sector Reform, Resistance, and Authoritarianism

  5. Back Matter
    Pages 249-252

About this book

Introduction

This book explores how the rule of power relates to the case of occupied Palestine, examining features of local dissent and international governance. The project considers expressions of the rule of power in two particular ways: settler colonialism and neoliberalism. As power is always accompanied by resistance, the authors engage with and explores forms of everyday resistance to the logics and regimes of neoliberal governance and settler colonialism. They investigate wide-ranging issues and dynamics related to international governance, liberal peacebuilding, statebuilding, and development, the claim to politics, and the notion and practice of resistance. This work will be of interest for academics focusing on modern Middle Eastern politics, international relations, as well as for courses on contemporary conflicts, peacebuilding, and development.

Keywords

Power in Palestine Israel/Palestine Conflict International Studies Association (ISA) Peace and Justice Studies Association (PJSA) Palestinian American Research Center (PARC) Middle East Studies Association (MESA) Occupied Palestine Resistance in Palestine Sovereignty in Palestine International Governance in Palestine Hamas in Gaza European Union and Palestine State-Building in Palestine Aid effectiveness in Palestine Mobilization in Palestine

Editors and affiliations

  • Alaa Tartir
    • 1
  • Timothy Seidel
    • 2
  1. 1.The Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (IHEID)GenevaSwitzerland
  2. 2.Department of Applied Social Sciences and Center for Justice and PeacebuildingEastern Mennonite UniversityHarrisonburgUSA

About the editors

Alaa Tartir is Research Associate at the Centre on Conflict, Development and Peacebuilding, The Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (IHEID), Switzerland, and Program Advisor to Al-Shabaka: The Palestinian Policy Network.

Timothy Seidel is Assistant Professor in the Department of Applied Social Sciences and the Center for Justice and Peacebuilding, Eastern Mennonite University, USA. 


Bibliographic information

Reviews

“The volume contributes to ongoing debates on the Palestine-Israel conflict and the role played by the international community and international donors. … This represents a valuable contribution to the established literature on the conflict.” (Flavia Clementi, The International Spectator, Vol. 54 (4), 2019)

“All the contributions of this book are equally interesting and thought provoking … . In summary, this volume presents many new ideas and new approaches, an impressive range of ethnographic research and fieldwork, the use of both quantitative and qualitative work, and to top it off, is thoroughly theory oriented. … Palestine and Rule of Power should be on the desk of every student of contemporary Palestine.” (Helga Baumgarten, Journal of Palestine Studies, Vol. 68 (4), 2019)

“Beata Paragi recommends this volume for exploring the diversity of Palestinian actors, voices and views when it comes to local political demands and modes of resistance. … Palestine and Rule of Power is an excellent volume targeting advanced readers, a valuable contribution to the growing body of literature and a recommended read that explores the diversity of actors, voices and views on the Palestinian side.” (Beata Paragi, LSE Review of Books, blogs.lse.ac.uk, May 30, 2019)