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Program Evaluation

A Field Guide for Administrators

  • Robert L. Schalock
  • Craig V. D. Thornton
Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xv
  2. Program Analysis

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-2
    2. Robert L. Schalock, Craig V. D. Thornton
      Pages 3-22
    3. Robert L. Schalock, Craig V. D. Thornton
      Pages 23-37
    4. Robert L. Schalock, Craig V. D. Thornton
      Pages 39-67
  3. Process Analysis

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 69-71
    2. Robert L. Schalock, Craig V. D. Thornton
      Pages 73-99
    3. Robert L. Schalock, Craig V. D. Thornton
      Pages 101-120
    4. Robert L. Schalock, Craig V. D. Thornton
      Pages 121-134
  4. Impact Analysis

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 135-137
    2. Robert L. Schalock, Craig V. D. Thornton
      Pages 139-156
    3. Robert L. Schalock, Craig V. D. Thornton
      Pages 157-179
  5. Benefit-Cost Analysis

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 181-184
    2. Robert L. Schalock, Craig V. D. Thornton
      Pages 185-223
    3. Robert L. Schalock, Craig V. D. Thornton
      Pages 225-231
  6. Analysis to Action

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 233-234
    2. Robert L. Schalock, Craig V. D. Thornton
      Pages 235-248
    3. Robert L. Schalock, Craig V. D. Thornton
      Pages 249-254
  7. Back Matter
    Pages 255-269

About this book

Introduction

This book is written to help human service program administrators either in­ terpret or conduct program evaluations. Our intended audience includes admin­ istrators and those students being trained for careers in human services administration. Our focus is on persons interested in assessing programs in which people work with people to improve their condition. The book's title, Program Evaluation: A Field Guide for Administrators, describes how we hope you use this book-as a tool. In writing the book, we have attempted to meet the needs of persons who have to conduct program evaluations as well as those who must use those evaluations. Hence, we have attempted to make the book "user friendly. " You will find, for example, numer­ ous guidelines, cautions, and specific suggestions. Use the book actively. Our primary motive is to help administrators make better decisions. In fact, the primary reason for program evaluation is to help program administrators make good decisions. These decisions often must balance the goals of equity (or fairness in the distribution of goods and services among people in the economy), efficiency (obtaining the most output for the least resources), and political feasi­ bility. Take, for example, the administrator who must decide between a new program favored by some of the program's constituents, and maintaining the status quo, which is favored by other constituents.

Keywords

decision making distribution economy efficiency evaluation interest science and technology service

Authors and affiliations

  • Robert L. Schalock
    • 1
  • Craig V. D. Thornton
    • 2
  1. 1.Hastings College and Mid-Nebraska Mental Retardation Services, Inc.HastingsUSA
  2. 2.Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.PrincetonUSA

Bibliographic information

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Pharma