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Global Climate and Ecosystem Change

  • Gordon J. MacDonald
  • Luigi Sertorio

Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 240)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-ix
  2. Climate Dynamics

    1. Gordon J. MacDonald
      Pages 1-95
    2. Dennis L. Hartmann
      Pages 97-140
  3. Ecosystem Change

  4. Nonlinear System Analysis

  5. Back Matter
    Pages 245-252

About this book

Introduction

Humankind's ever-expanding activities have caused environmental changes that reach beyond localities and regions to become global in scope. Disturbances to the atmosphere, oceans, and land produce changes in the living parts of the planet, while, at the same time, alterations in the biosphere modify the atmosphere, oceans, and land. Understanding this complex web of interactions poses unprecedented intellectual challenges. The atmospheric concentrations of natural trace gases-carbon dioxide (C0 ), methane (CH. ), nitrous oxide (N0), and lower-atmosphere ozone 2 2 (Os)-have increased since the beginning of the industrial revolution. Industrial gases such as the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which are not part of the natural global ecosystem, are increasing at much greater rates than are the naturally occurring trace gases. All these gases absorb and emit infrared radiation and thus have the potential for altering global climate. The major terrestrial biomes are also changing. Although world attention has focused on deforestation, particularly in tropical areas, the development of agriculture, the diversion of water resources, and urbanization have all modified terrestrial ecosystems in both obvious and subtle ways. The terrestrial biosphere, by taking up atmospheric carbon dioxide, acts as a primary determinant of the overall carbon balance of the global ecosystem. Although the ways in which the biosphere absorbs carbon are, as yet, poorly understood, the destruction (and regrowth) of forests certainly alter this process.

Keywords

Potential biosphere development ecosystem environment terrestrial ecosystem terrestrial ecosystems

Editors and affiliations

  • Gordon J. MacDonald
    • 1
  • Luigi Sertorio
    • 2
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaSan Diego, La JollaUSA
  2. 2.University of TurinTurinItaly

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-2483-4
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1990
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4899-2485-8
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4899-2483-4
  • Series Print ISSN 0258-1221
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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