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Handbook of Adolescent Health Risk Behavior

  • Ralph J. DiClemente
  • William B. Hansen
  • Lynn E. Ponton

Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxiii
  2. Ralph J. DiClemente, William B. Hansen, Lynn E. Ponton
    Pages 1-4
  3. C. Wayne Sells, Robert Wm. Blum
    Pages 5-34
  4. Vivien Igra, Charles E. Irwin Jr.
    Pages 35-51
  5. Cheryl L. Perry, Michael J. Staufacker
    Pages 53-81
  6. Lynn E. Ponton
    Pages 83-113
  7. Michael Windle, Jean Thatcher Shope, Oscar Bukstein
    Pages 115-159
  8. William B. Hansen, Patrick M. O’Malley
    Pages 161-192
  9. Yifat Cohen, Anthony Spirito, Larry K. Brown
    Pages 193-224
  10. Ilana Lescohier, Susan Scavo Gallagher
    Pages 225-258
  11. Denise C. Gottfredson, Miriam D. Sealock, Christopher S. Koper
    Pages 259-288
  12. Arlene Rubin Stiffman, Felton Earls, Peter Dore, Renee Cunningham, Sharon Farber
    Pages 289-312
  13. Catherine Stevens-Simon, Elizabeth R. McAnarney
    Pages 313-332
  14. Lawrence J. D’Angelo, Ralph J. DiClemente
    Pages 333-367
  15. Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus, Michelle Parra, Coleen Cantwell, Marya Gwadz, Debra A. Murphy
    Pages 369-391
  16. John B. Sikorski
    Pages 393-411
  17. Ralph J. DiClemente, Lynn E. Ponton, William B. Hansen
    Pages 413-420
  18. Back Matter
    Pages 421-440

About this book

Introduction

Adolescence is a developmental period of accelerating physical, psychological, social! cultural, and cognitive development, often characterized by confronting and surmounting a myriad of challenges and establishing a sense of self-identity and autonomy. It is also, unfortunately, a period fraught with many threats to the health and well-being of adoles­ cents and with substantial consequent impairment and disability. Many of the adverse health consequences experienced by adolescents are, to a large extent, the result of their risk behaviors. Many adolescents today, and perhaps an increasing number in the future, are at risk for death, disease, and other adverse health outcomes that are not primarily biomedical in origin. In general, there has been a marked change in the causes of morbidity and mortality among adolescents. Previously, infectious diseases accounted for a dispro­ portionate share of adolescent morbidity and mortality. At present, however, the over­ whelming toll of adolescent morbidity and mortality is the result of lifestyle practices.

Keywords

AIDS assessment intervention prevention prevention strategies suicide

Editors and affiliations

  • Ralph J. DiClemente
    • 1
  • William B. Hansen
    • 2
  • Lynn E. Ponton
    • 3
  1. 1.Departments of Health Behavior and PediatricsUniversity of AlabamaBirminghamUSA
  2. 2.Department of Public Health SciencesBowman Gray School of MedicineWinston-SalemUSA
  3. 3.Langley Porter Psychiatric Institute, Division of Child and Adolescent PsychiatryUniversity of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-0203-0
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1996
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4899-0205-4
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4899-0203-0
  • Series Print ISSN 1574-0471
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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