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© 2017

Interpreting LISP

Programming and Data Structures

Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Gary D. Knott
    Pages 1-1
  3. Gary D. Knott
    Pages 3-8
  4. Gary D. Knott
    Pages 9-10
  5. Gary D. Knott
    Pages 11-15
  6. Gary D. Knott
    Pages 17-18
  7. Gary D. Knott
    Pages 19-21
  8. Gary D. Knott
    Pages 23-26
  9. Gary D. Knott
    Pages 27-29
  10. Gary D. Knott
    Pages 31-33
  11. Gary D. Knott
    Pages 35-38
  12. Gary D. Knott
    Pages 39-41
  13. Gary D. Knott
    Pages 43-45
  14. Gary D. Knott
    Pages 47-51
  15. Gary D. Knott
    Pages 53-56
  16. Gary D. Knott
    Pages 57-57
  17. Gary D. Knott
    Pages 59-59
  18. Gary D. Knott
    Pages 61-62
  19. Gary D. Knott
    Pages 63-65
  20. Gary D. Knott
    Pages 67-73

About this book

Introduction

Learn Lisp programming in a data structures context, including tables, functions, forms, expressions, typed-pointers, I/O, garbage collection and some applications. This short primer contains a careful description of the data structures manipulated by Lisp functions. These data structures and others, notably hash tables, are also used in constructing a Lisp interpreter.  

Interpreting Lisp will be of special interest to those learning and using programming languages and computer architecture as well as data structures. This book will be useful to autodidacts, professional programmers, and computer enthusiasts in a wide variety of fields.

You will:
  • Use the atom table and the number table in Lisp 
  • Master expressions, typed pointers, arguments and results in typed pointers, and more
  • Write lambda expressions in Lisp 
  • Bind actual values to formal arguments 
  • Develop games in Lisp

Keywords

lisp programming language software functional scripting coding

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.Civilized Software Inc.Silver SpringUSA

About the authors

Gary Knott, PhD is founder/CEO of Civlized Inc., the makers of MLAB.  He is also a professor, expert consultant in mathematical models with emphasis on applications of interest  to the National Institute of Health (NIH).  He was a computer scientist and programmer for the NIH as well. 

Bibliographic information

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