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Pathology of the Human Placenta

  • Kurt Benirschke
  • Peter Kaufmann

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xix
  2. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 1-12
  3. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 13-15
  4. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 16-28
  5. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 29-41
  6. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 42-49
  7. M. Castellucci, P. Kaufmann
    Pages 50-115
  8. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 116-154
  9. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 155-170
  10. H. G. Frank, P. Kaufmann
    Pages 171-272
  11. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 273-280
  12. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 281-334
  13. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 335-398
  14. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 399-418
  15. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 419-436
  16. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 437-460
  17. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 461-491
  18. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 492-515
  19. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 516-522
  20. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 591-684
  21. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 718-753
  22. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 754-777
  23. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 778-789
  24. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 790-902
  25. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 903-916
  26. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 917-919
  27. Kurt Benirschke, Peter Kaufmann
    Pages 920-927
  28. Back Matter
    Pages 929-951

About this book

Introduction

Most obstetricians and pediatricians would agree that the examination of the pla­ centa often helps to explain an abnormal neonatal outcome. As early as in 1892, Bal­ lantyne wrote that A diseased faetus without its placenta is an imperfect specimen, and a description of a foetal malady, unless accompanied by a notice of the placental condition, is incomplete. Deductions drawn from such a case cannot be considered as conclusive, for in the missing placenta or cord may have existed the cause of the disease and death. During intrauterine life the foetus, the membranes, the cord and the placenta form an organic whole, and disease of any part must react upon and affect the others. Similar thoughts were succinctly detailed in Price's discussion of his concept of the "prenatal biases" as they affected twins. His contribution also admonishes us that placental study is a sine qua non for a more perfect understanding of fetal develop­ ment (1950). Despite all this understanding of the past and appreciation for placen­ tal disease, great resistance still exists to performing the task of placental examination routinely. For many pathologists, therefore, the placenta has remained a mysterious organ.

Keywords

anatomy cell genetics molecular biology pathology placenta pregnancy

Authors and affiliations

  • Kurt Benirschke
    • 1
  • Peter Kaufmann
    • 2
  1. 1.University Medical CenterUniversity of California, San DiegoSan DiegoUSA
  2. 2.Institut für Anatomie der Medizinischen FakultätRheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule AachenAachenGermany

Bibliographic information

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