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An Introduction to the Mathematics of Biology: with Computer Algebra Models

  • Edward K. Yeargers
  • Ronald W. Shonkwiler
  • James V. Herod

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-x
  2. Edward K. Yeargers, Ronald W. Shonkwiler, James V. Herod
    Pages 1-8
  3. Edward K. Yeargers, Ronald W. Shonkwiler, James V. Herod
    Pages 9-76
  4. Edward K. Yeargers, Ronald W. Shonkwiler, James V. Herod
    Pages 77-97
  5. Edward K. Yeargers, Ronald W. Shonkwiler, James V. Herod
    Pages 98-131
  6. Edward K. Yeargers, Ronald W. Shonkwiler, James V. Herod
    Pages 132-153
  7. Edward K. Yeargers, Ronald W. Shonkwiler, James V. Herod
    Pages 154-193
  8. Edward K. Yeargers, Ronald W. Shonkwiler, James V. Herod
    Pages 194-233
  9. Edward K. Yeargers, Ronald W. Shonkwiler, James V. Herod
    Pages 234-263
  10. Edward K. Yeargers, Ronald W. Shonkwiler, James V. Herod
    Pages 264-318
  11. Edward K. Yeargers, Ronald W. Shonkwiler, James V. Herod
    Pages 319-368
  12. Edward K. Yeargers, Ronald W. Shonkwiler, James V. Herod
    Pages 369-409
  13. Back Matter
    Pages 411-417

About this book

Introduction

Biology is a source of fascination for most scientists, whether their training is in the life sciences or not. In particular, there is a special satisfaction in discovering an understanding of biology in the context of another science like mathematics. Fortunately there are plenty of interesting (and fun) problems in biology, and virtually all scientific disciplines have become the richer for it. For example, two major journals, Mathematical Biosciences and Journal of Mathematical Biology, have tripled in size since their inceptions 20-25 years ago. The various sciences have a great deal to give to one another, but there are still too many fences separating them. In writing this book we have adopted the philosophy that mathematical biology is not merely the intrusion of one science into another, but has a unity of its own, in which both the biology and the math­ ematics should be equal and complete, and should flow smoothly into and out of one another. We have taught mathematical biology with this philosophy in mind and have seen profound changes in the outlooks of our science and engineering students: The attitude of "Oh no, another pendulum on a spring problem!," or "Yet one more LCD circuit!" completely disappeared in the face of applications of mathematics in biology. There is a timeliness in calculating a protocol for ad­ ministering a drug.

Keywords

algebra calculus chemistry computer algebra differential equation equation function genetics kinetics linear regression Mathematica mathematical biology mathematics philosophy variable

Authors and affiliations

  • Edward K. Yeargers
    • 1
  • Ronald W. Shonkwiler
    • 2
  • James V. Herod
    • 2
  1. 1.School of BiologyGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.School of MathematicsGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA

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