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The Logic of Logistics

Theory, Algorithms, and Applications for Logistics Management

  • Julien Bramel
  • David Simchi-Levi
Textbook

Part of the Springer Series in Operations Research book series (ORFE)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Introduction

    1. Julien Bramel, David Simchi-Levi
      Pages 1-11
  3. Performance Analysis Techniques

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 13-13
    2. Julien Bramel, David Simchi-Levi
      Pages 15-35
    3. Julien Bramel, David Simchi-Levi
      Pages 37-50
    4. Julien Bramel, David Simchi-Levi
      Pages 51-65
  4. Vehicle Routing Models

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 67-67
    2. Julien Bramel, David Simchi-Levi
      Pages 69-80
    3. Julien Bramel, David Simchi-Levi
      Pages 81-106
    4. Julien Bramel, David Simchi-Levi
      Pages 107-123
    5. Julien Bramel, David Simchi-Levi
      Pages 125-141
  5. Inventory Models

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 143-143
    2. Julien Bramel, David Simchi-Levi
      Pages 145-164
    3. Julien Bramel, David Simchi-Levi
      Pages 165-177
    4. Julien Bramel, David Simchi-Levi
      Pages 179-199
  6. Hierarchical Models

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 201-201
    2. Julien Bramel, David Simchi-Levi
      Pages 203-217
    3. Julien Bramel, David Simchi-Levi
      Pages 219-235
  7. Logistics Algorithms in Practice

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 237-237
    2. Julien Bramel, David Simchi-Levi
      Pages 239-254
    3. Julien Bramel, David Simchi-Levi
      Pages 255-264
  8. Back Matter
    Pages 265-281

About this book

Introduction

This book grew out a number of distribution and logistics graduate courses we have taught over the last ten years. In the first few years, the emphasis was on very basic models such as the traveling salesman problem, and on the seminal papers of Haimovich and Rinnooy Kan (1985), which analyzed a simple vehicle routing problem, and Roundy (1985), which introduced power-of-two policies and proved that they are effective for the one warehouse multi-retailer distribution system. At that time, few results existed for more complex, realistic distribution problems, stochastic inventory problems or the integration of these issues. In the last few years however, there has been renewed interest in the area of logistics among both industry and academia. A number of forces have contributed to this shift. First, industry has realized the magnitude of savings that can be achieved by better planning and management of complex logistics systems. In­ deed, a striking example is Wal-Mart's success story which is partly attributed to implementing a new logistics strategy, called cross-docking. Second, advances in information and communication technologies together with sophisticated decision support systems now make it possible to design, implement and control logistics strategies that reduce system-wide costs and improve service level. These decision support systems, with their increasingly user-friendly interfaces, are fundamentally changing the management of logistics systems.

Keywords

Logistics Logistics Strategy distribution optimization supply chain planning

Authors and affiliations

  • Julien Bramel
    • 1
  • David Simchi-Levi
    • 2
  1. 1.Management Science Division, Graduate School of BusinessColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Industrial Engineering and Management SciencesNorthwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-9309-2
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag New York 1997
  • Publisher Name Springer, New York, NY
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4684-9311-5
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4684-9309-2
  • Series Print ISSN 1431-8598
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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