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Becoming a Medical Specialist

  • Richard L. Cohen

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-viii
  2. Introduction

    1. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 1-7
  3. The “Medical” Specialties

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 9-9
    2. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 11-20
    3. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 21-32
    4. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 33-44
    5. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 45-55
    6. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 57-62
  4. The “Surgical” Specialties

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 63-63
    2. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 65-74
    3. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 75-85
    4. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 87-98
    5. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 99-106
    6. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 107-112
    7. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 113-119
  5. The “Hospital-Based” Specialties

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 121-121
    2. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 123-134
    3. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 135-142
    4. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 143-151
  6. The “General” Specialties

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 153-153
    2. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 155-166
    3. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 167-176
  7. Generic Issues

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 177-177
    2. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 179-202
    3. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 203-214
    4. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 215-233
  8. Conclusions and Recommendations

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 235-235
    2. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 237-244
    3. Richard L. Cohen
      Pages 245-252
    4. Thomas Detre
      Pages 253-256
  9. Back Matter
    Pages 257-263

About this book

Introduction

This book is about how young physicians experience training as medical specialists. Much attention is now being drawn to the stresses of post­ graduate medical education, their potential negative impact on the qual­ ity of patient care, and the manner in which these stresses influence the professional and personal development of the physicians involved. The entire focus of this book is on the firsthand experience of 52 such physicians enrolled in 16 different medical specialty training programs. Because the evaluation of stress is largely a subjective one, I have elected through the perception and the cognitive pro­ to approach the question cesses of the trainees themselves. THE DOCTORS The "subjects" of this work are 52 young physicians who volun­ teered to be interviewed confidentially and anonymously during the 1986-1987 academic year. They represent the specialties of anesthesiol­ ogy, clinical pathology, dermatology, emergency medicine, family prac­ tice, general surgery, internal medicine, neurology, neurosurgery, obstetrics and gynecology, ophthalmology, orthopedic surgery, oto­ laryngology, pediatrics, psychiatry, and radiology.

Keywords

dermatology emergency medicine hospital internal medicine neurology neurosurgery obstetrics ophthalmology pathology pediatrics psychiatry radiology stress surgery urology

Authors and affiliations

  • Richard L. Cohen
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA

Bibliographic information

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