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Cavitation Reaction Engineering

  • Y. T. Shah
  • A. B. Pandit
  • V. S. Moholkar
Book

Part of the The Plenum Chemical Engineering Series book series (PCES)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xix
  2. Y. T. Shah, A. B. Pandit, V. S. Moholkar
    Pages 1-14
  3. Y. T. Shah, A. B. Pandit, V. S. Moholkar
    Pages 15-54
  4. Y. T. Shah, A. B. Pandit, V. S. Moholkar
    Pages 55-83
  5. Y. T. Shah, A. B. Pandit, V. S. Moholkar
    Pages 85-153
  6. Y. T. Shah, A. B. Pandit, V. S. Moholkar
    Pages 155-192
  7. Y. T. Shah, A. B. Pandit, V. S. Moholkar
    Pages 193-245
  8. Y. T. Shah, A. B. Pandit, V. S. Moholkar
    Pages 247-275
  9. Y. T. Shah, A. B. Pandit, V. S. Moholkar
    Pages 277-312
  10. Y. T. Shah, A. B. Pandit, V. S. Moholkar
    Pages 313-332
  11. Back Matter
    Pages 333-352

About this book

Introduction

The literature on cavitation chemistry is ripe with conjectures, possibilities, heuris­ tic arguments, and intelligent guesses. The chemical effects of cavitation have been explained by means of many theories, consisting of empirical constants, adjustable parameters, and the like. The chemists working with cavitation chemistry agree that the phenomenon is very complex and system specific. Mathematicians and physi­ cists have offered partial solutions to the observed phenomena on the basis of cavitation parameters, whereas chemists have attempted explanations based on the modes of reaction and the detection of intermediate chemical species. Nevertheless, no one has been able to formulate a unified theme, however crude, for its effects on the basis of the known parameters, such as cavitation and transient chemistry involving extremely high temperatures of nanosecond durations. When one surveys the literature on cavitation-assisted reactions, it is clear that the approach so far has been "Edisonian" in nature. While a large number of reactions have showed either enhanced yields or reduced reaction times, many reactions have remained unaffected in the presence of cavitation. The success or failure of cavitation reactions ultimately depends on the collapse of the cavity. Cavitation chemistry is based on the principles of the formation of small transient cavities, their growth and implosion, which produce chemical reactions caused by the generation of extreme pressures and temperatures and a high degree of micro­ turbulence.

Keywords

chemistry health heat transfer industry polymer scaling temperature transport water

Authors and affiliations

  • Y. T. Shah
    • 1
  • A. B. Pandit
    • 2
  • V. S. Moholkar
    • 2
  1. 1.Clemson UniversityClemsonUSA
  2. 2.University of BombayBombayIndia

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-4787-7
  • Copyright Information Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York 1999
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4613-7168-7
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4615-4787-7
  • Series Print ISSN 1566-7944
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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