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Electronic Materials

From Silicon to Organics

  • L. S. Miller
  • J. B. Mullin

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxiv
  2. L. S. Miller
    Pages 9-17
  3. L. S. Miller
    Pages 25-32
  4. David A. Anderson
    Pages 33-45
  5. R. H. Wallis
    Pages 47-65
  6. A. W. Nelson
    Pages 67-89
  7. J. B. Mullin
    Pages 111-126
  8. J. B. Mullin
    Pages 127-142
  9. D. J. Foster
    Pages 173-191
  10. Brian Ray
    Pages 211-223
  11. Robert M. Hill
    Pages 253-265
  12. Michael G. Carter
    Pages 267-282
  13. R. W. Munn
    Pages 291-299
  14. Simon Allen
    Pages 301-313
  15. M. J. Goodwin
    Pages 315-328
  16. Malcolm H. Dunn
    Pages 329-355
  17. David Coates
    Pages 375-389
  18. E. P. Raynes
    Pages 391-404
  19. Sally E. Day
    Pages 405-416
  20. D. A. Cardwell
    Pages 417-430
  21. D. E. Hookes
    Pages 431-448
  22. D. J. Walton
    Pages 449-470
  23. Harry G. Heller
    Pages 471-483
  24. J. R. Dodgson
    Pages 509-533
  25. Back Matter
    Pages 535-542

About this book

Introduction

Electronic materials are a dominant factor in many areas of modern technology. The need to understand'them is paramount; this book addresses that need. The main aim of this volume is to provide a broad unified view of electronic materials, including key aspects of their science and technology and also, in many cases, their commercial implications. It was considered important that much of the contents of such an overview should be intelligible by a broad audience of graduates and industrial scientists, and relevant to advanced undergraduate studies. It should also be up to date and even looking forward to the future. Although more extensive, and written specifically as a text, the resulting book has much in common with a short course of the same name given at Coventry Polytechnic. The interpretation of the term "electronic materials" used in this volume is a very broad one, in line with the initial aim. The principal restriction is that, with one or two minor exceptions relating to aspects of device processing, for example, the materials dealt with are all active materials. Materials such as simple insulators or simple conductors, playing only a passive role, are not singled out for consider­ ation. Active materials might be defined as those involved in the processing of signals in a way that depends crucially on some specific property of those materials, and the immediate question then concerns the types of signals that might be considered.

Keywords

electronic material material signal

Editors and affiliations

  • L. S. Miller
    • 1
  • J. B. Mullin
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Coventry PolytechnicCoventryEngland
  2. 2.Electronic Materials ConsultancyMalvernEngland
  3. 3.Royal Signals and Radar EstablishmentMalvernEngland

Bibliographic information

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Materials & Steel
Automotive
Chemical Manufacturing
Biotechnology
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Aerospace