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Diet and Breast Cancer

  • Elizabeth K. Weisburger

Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 364)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xv
  2. Barry R. Goldin, Sherwood L. Gorbach
    Pages 35-46
  3. Joseph A. Scimeca, Henry J. Thompson, Clement Ip
    Pages 59-65
  4. David P. Rose, Jeanne M. Connolly, Xin-Hua Liu
    Pages 83-91
  5. Richard C. Moon
    Pages 101-107
  6. Sylvia Christakos
    Pages 115-118
  7. Nikolay V. Dimitrov, Rui-Qin Pan, Jan Bauer, Thomas I. Jones
    Pages 119-127
  8. Back Matter
    Pages 129-183

About this book

Introduction

The fourth annual American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) conference on diet, nutrition and cancer was held at the L'Enfant Plaza Hotel in Washington, D. C. , September 2~3, 1993. In keeping with present concerns and in line with current trends, the theme was "Diet and Breast Cancer. " This proceedings volume is comprised of chapters from the platform presentations of the two day conference and abstracts from the poster session held at the end of the first day. Experimentally, there is sufficient evidence to support a relationship between dietary fat and the risk of breast cancer. A meta-analysis was provided by data from 114 experiments with over 10,000 animals, divided into groups fed ad libitum on diets with different levels or sources of fat, or different levels of energy restriction. This exercise suggested that linoleic acid was a major determinant of mammary tumor development but that other fatty acids also enhanced mammary tumor development in animals. However, as mentioned by several speakers, results from epidemiological studies often are conflicting, thus leading to confusion among both health professionals and the public. Surveys of specific populations which have migrated from countries with low breast cancer rates to those with higher rates are often some of the most compelling studies with respect to a high fat diet-breast cancer association. Nonetheless, various cohort and prospective studies, some quite large, did not appear to show a relationship between consumption of fat (any type) and breast cancer.

Keywords

breast cancer cancer cancer research fat health nutrition tumor

Editors and affiliations

  • Elizabeth K. Weisburger
    • 1
  1. 1.American Institute for Cancer ResearchUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-2510-3
  • Copyright Information Plenum Press, New York 1994
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4613-6068-1
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4615-2510-3
  • Series Print ISSN 0065-2598
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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