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© 2013

Traffic Measurement on the Internet

Book
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Part of the SpringerBriefs in Computer Science book series (BRIEFSCOMPUTER)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-ix
  2. Tao Li, Shigang Chen
    Pages 1-9
  3. Tao Li, Shigang Chen
    Pages 11-35
  4. Tao Li, Shigang Chen
    Pages 37-63
  5. T. Li, S. Chen
    Pages 65-82

About this book

Introduction

Traffic Measurement on the Internet presents several novel online measurement methods that are compact and fast. Traffic measurement provides critical real-world data for service providers and network administrations to perform capacity planning, accounting and billing, anomaly detection, and service provision. Statistical methods play important roles in many measurement functions including: system designing, model building, formula deriving, and error analyzing. One of the greatest challenges in designing an online measurement function is to minimize the per-packet processing time in order to keep up with the line speed of the modern routers. This book also introduces a challenging problem – the measurement of per-flow information in high-speed networks, as well as, the solution. The last chapter discusses origin-destination flow measurement.

Keywords

Dynamic bit sharing Internet technologies Randomized counter sharing Statistical methods Traffic measurement

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1., Department of Computer and InformationUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA
  2. 2., Department of ComputerandUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

Bibliographic information

Industry Sectors
Automotive
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Electronics
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Aerospace
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Engineering

Reviews

From the reviews:

“This book presents several online measurement methods. … this well-structured text on efficient online network traffic measurement presents the material--both the conceptual and theoretical, as well as the experimental parts--in a very readable way. Each of the four chapters ends with a list of highly relevant references.” (G. Haring, ACM Computing Reviews, January, 2013)