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© 2013

Biology and Regulation of Blood-Tissue Barriers

  • C. Yan Cheng

Benefits

  • Written by outstanding investigators in their fields

  • Covers some of the more interesting aspects of research in blood-tissue barriers

  • Focuses on topics that are physiologically applicable to all blood-tissue barriers

Book

Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 763)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xx
  2. Tamima Ashraf, Olena Kis, Nilasha Banerjee, Reina Bendayan
    Pages 20-69
  3. Matthew Campbell, Peter Humphries
    Pages 70-84
  4. Ken-ichi Hosoya, Masanori Tachikawa
    Pages 85-104
  5. Sam C. Nalle, Jerrold R. Turner
    Pages 105-131
  6. Wen-Hui Su, Dolores D. Mruk, Elissa W. P. Wong, Wing-Yee Lui, C. Yan Cheng
    Pages 149-170
  7. Michelle K. Y. Siu, C. Yan Cheng
    Pages 186-192
  8. Hsiao Chang Chan, Hui Chen, Yechun Ruan, Tingting Sun
    Pages 193-217
  9. Évemie Dubé, Daniel G. Cyr
    Pages 218-236
  10. Luiz R. França, Sarah A. Auharek, Rex A. Hess, Jannette M. Dufour, Barry T. Hinton
    Pages 237-259
  11. Michelle W. M. Li, Dolores D. Mruk, C. Yan Cheng
    Pages 260-280
  12. Xiang Xiao, Dolores D. Mruk, Faith L. Cheng, C. Yan Cheng
    Pages 295-317
  13. Linlin Su, Pranitha Jenardhanan, Dolores D. Mruk, Premendu P. Mathur, Yan-ho Cheng, Ka-Wai Mok et al.
    Pages 318-333
  14. Ka-Wai Mok, Pearl P. Y. Lie, Dolores D. Mruk, Jayakanthan Mannu, Premendu P. Mathur, Bruno Silvestrini et al.
    Pages 334-355
  15. Back Matter
    Pages 357-361

About this book

Introduction

This book was written by many outstanding investigators who have spent decades to study different aspects of blood‑tissue barrier function. They have summarized some of the latest and fascinating development in their fields of research including the blood‑brain barrier, the blood‑retinal barrier, the gut barrier, the blood‑biliary barrier, the blood‑follicle barrier, the blood‑epididymis barrier, the blood‑testis barrier, the tight junction barrier in general as well as barriers in the female reproductive tract. Included are also chapters that focus on topics that are physiologically applicable to all blood‑tissue barriers. Many of these chapters also include information on specific human diseases, such as pathological changes of the gut barrier that cause bowel disorders resulting from inflammation of the epithelial lining in the intestine, and infertility in men as a result of disruption of the blood‑epididymal and/or blood‑testis barriers; and on new therapeutic approaches (e.g., drug delivery across the blood‑brain and the blood‑retinal barriers).

Keywords

Biology Blood‑Tissue Blood‑Tissue Barriers C. Yan Cheng Regulation

Editors and affiliations

  • C. Yan Cheng
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Biomedical ResearchPopulation CouncilNew YorkUSA

About the editors

Dr. C. Yan Cheng is a native of Hong Kong and a graduate from the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 1977. Shortly after receiving his BSc, he began his graduate training in the laboratory of Professor Barry Boettcher at the University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia and received his PhD in 1981. He joined the laboratory of Dr. C. Wayne Bardin as a postdoctoral fellow, working with him and Drs. Neal A. Musto and Glen Gunsalus at the Population Council’s Center for Biomedical Research located on the campus of the Rockefeller University in New York City for a little over 4 years. During this period, he had the opportunity to interact with a number of eminent scientists and visiting scientists who were at the Population Council including Drs. Jennie Mather, Vilma Rossi, and Geoffrey Hammond. Dr. Bardin had also created an unprecedented stimulating and competitive environment that shaped his career in life sciences. Through his collaboration with Dr. Vilma Rossi, he met Professor Bruno Silvestrini in the summer of 1985 in New York, and began a scientific collaboration that spans more than two decades to develop new derivatives of indazole‑carboxylic acid for male contraception with the development of adjudin, 1‑(2,4‑dichlorobenzyl)‑1H‑indazole‑3‑carbohydrazide, as a potential male contraception. He has also used different animal models, such as the adjudin model, the cadmium model, the bisphenol A model and a few genetic models to study different aspects of testicular function in particular the biology and regulation of cell adhesion in the testis. Through this work, he and his colleagues, Drs. Helen Yan, Elissa Wong, Will Lee and Dolores Mruk, have discovered a functional axis that links the different cellular compartments in the seminiferous epithelium of the testis known as the apical ectoplasmic specialization‑blood‑testis barrier‑hemidesmosome/basement membrane axis that coordinates different cellular events during the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. They have also identified several putative signaling pathways and nonreceptor protein kinases, such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK ) and members of the c‑Src kinases, that regulate blood‑testis barrier dynamics. Some of these findings are currently under development to design innovative compounds for male contraception. For the past three decades, his laboratory has received supports from the Angelini Research Institute, Rockefeller Foundation, Lupus Foundation of America, CONRAD Program, USAID, and the National Institutes of Health. He has published over 300 research articles and reviews in peer‑reviewed journals in the field. He is currently a Senior Scientist and the Head of the Mary M. Wohlford Laboratory for Male Contraceptive Research at the Population Council’s Center for Biomedical Research in New York City.

1H‑indazole‑3‑carbohydrazide, as a potential male contraception. He has also used different animal models, such as the adjudin model, the cadmium model, the bisphenol A model and a few genetic models to study different aspects of testicular function in particular the biology and regulation of cell adhesion in the testis. Through this work, he and his colleagues, Drs. Helen Yan, Elissa Wong, Will Lee and Dolores Mruk, have discovered a functional axis that links the different cellular compartments in the seminiferous epithelium of the testis known as the apical ectoplasmic specialization‑blood‑testis barrier‑hemidesmosome/basement membrane axis that coordinates different cellular events during the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. They have also identified several putative signaling pathways and nonreceptor protein kinases, such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK ) and members of the c‑Src kinases, that regulate blood‑testis barrier dynamics. Some of these findings are currently under development to design innovative compounds for male contraception. For the past three decades, his laboratory has received supports from the Angelini Research Institute, Rockefeller Foundation, Lupus Foundation of America, CONRAD Program, USAID, and the National Institutes of Health. He has published over 300 research articles and reviews in peer‑reviewed journals in the field. He is currently a Senior Scientist and the Head of the Mary M. Wohlford Laboratory for Male Contraceptive Research at the Population Council’s Center for Biomedical Research in New York City.

Bibliographic information

  • Book Title Biology and Regulation of Blood-Tissue Barriers
  • Editors C. Yan Cheng
  • Series Title Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-4711-5
  • Copyright Information Landes Bioscience and Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013
  • Publisher Name Springer, New York, NY
  • eBook Packages Biomedical and Life Sciences Biomedical and Life Sciences (R0)
  • Hardcover ISBN 978-1-4614-4710-8
  • eBook ISBN 978-1-4614-4711-5
  • Series ISSN 0065-2598
  • Series E-ISSN 2214-8019
  • Edition Number 1
  • Number of Pages XX, 361
  • Number of Illustrations 0 b/w illustrations, 0 illustrations in colour
  • Topics Molecular Medicine
    Biomedicine, general
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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