Advertisement

Caveolins and Caveolae

Roles in Signaling and Disease Mechanisms

  • Jean-François Jasmin
  • Philippe G. Frank
  • Michael P. Lisanti
Book

Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 729)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xx
  2. Identification and Cellular Functions of Caveolae and Caveolins

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Valerie L. Reeves, Candice M. Thomas, Eric J. Smart
      Pages 3-13
    3. Cécile Boscher, Ivan Robert Nabi
      Pages 29-50
    4. Chieko Mineo, Philip W. Shaul
      Pages 51-62
  3. Caveolae and Caveolins in Human Diseases

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 63-63
    2. Fabiana S. Machado, Nilda E. Rodriguez, Daniel Adesse, Luciana R. Garzoni, Lisia Esper, Michael P. Lisanti et al.
      Pages 65-82
    3. Isabelle Mercier, Michael P. Lisanti
      Pages 83-94
    4. Michael R. Freeman, Wei Yang, Dolores Di Vizio
      Pages 95-110
    5. Stephanos Pavlides, Jorge L. Gutierrez-Pajares, Christiane Danilo, Michael P. Lisanti, Philippe G. Frank
      Pages 127-144
    6. Mathivadhani Panneerselvam, Hemal H. Patel, David M. Roth
      Pages 145-156
    7. Nikolaos A. Maniatis, Olga Chernaya, Vasily Shinin, Richard D. Minshall
      Pages 157-179
  4. Back Matter
    Pages 181-184

About this book

Introduction

Caveolae are 50-100 nm flask-shaped invaginations of the plasma membrane that are primarily composed of cholesterol and sphingolipids. Using modern electron microscopy techniques, caveolae can be observed as omega-shaped invaginations of the plasma membrane, fully-invaginated caveolae, grape-like clusters of interconnected caveolae (caveosome), or as transcellular channels as a consequence of the fusion of individual caveolae. The caveolin gene family consists of three distinct members, namely Cav-1, Cav-2 and Cav-3. Cav-1 and Cav-2 proteins are usually co-expressed and particularly abundant in epithelial, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells as well as adipocytes and fibroblasts. On the other hand, the Cav-3 protein appears to be muscle-specific and is therefore only expressed in smooth, skeletal and cardiac muscles. Caveolin proteins form high molecular weight homo- and/or hetero-oligomers and assume an unusual topology with both their N- and C-terminal domains facing the cytoplasm.

Keywords

Caveolae Caveolin Frank Jasmin Lisanti Mechanism Signaling

Editors and affiliations

  • Jean-François Jasmin
    • 1
  • Philippe G. Frank
    • 2
  • Michael P. Lisanti
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative MedicineThomas Jefferson UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Cancer Biology, and Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative MedicineThomas Jefferson UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

Bibliographic information

Industry Sectors
Biomedicine
Pharma
Health & Hospitals
Biotechnology
Consumer Packaged Goods